Skip to content Skip to navigation

National Quality Forum Endorses 21 New Measures for Nursing Homes

March 4, 2011
by root
| Reprints

The National Quality Forum (NQF) has endorsed 21 measures in caring for both long-term residents and short-stay patients, to be used in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ Nursing Home Compare Web site. The measures address falls, infections, pressure ulcers, and the general health of residents and patients.

In 2004, NQF endorsed an initial set of measures for publicly reporting care in nursing homes. With the completion of the current project, the 17 measures that were previously endorsed will be retired and, in some instances, replaced by the newly endorsed measures. These measures were recently retired in the transition to CMS’ updated data collection instrument, the Minimum Data Set 3.0 (MDS 3.0).

The endorsed measures are as follows:

1. Physical therapy or nursing rehabilitation/restorative care for long-stay patients with new balance problem (RAND)

2. Percent of residents experiencing one or more falls with major injury (long stay) (CMS)

3. The percentage of residents on a scheduled pain medication regimen on admission who report a decrease in pain intensity or frequency (short stay) (CMS)

4. Percent of residents who self-report moderate to severe pain (short stay) (CMS)

5. Percent of residents who self-report moderate to severe pain (long stay) (CMS)

6. Percent of residents with pressure ulcers that are new or worsened (short stay) (CMS)

7. Percent of high-risk residents with pressure ulcers (long stay) (CMS)

8. Percent of residents assessed and appropriately given the seasonal influenza vaccine during the flu season (short stay) (CMS)

9. Percent of residents assessed and appropriately given the seasonal influenza vaccine (long stay) (CMS)

10. Percent of residents assessed and appropriately given the pneumococcal vaccine (short stay) (CMS)

11. Percent of residents assessed and appropriately given the pneumococcal vaccine (long stay) (CMS)

12. Percent of residents with a urinary tract infection (long stay) (CMS)

13. Percent of low-risk residents who lose control of their bowels or bladder (long stay) (CMS)

14. Percent of residents who have/had a catheter inserted and left in their bladder (long stay) (CMS)

15. Percent of residents who were physically restrained (long stay) (CMS)

16. Percent of residents whose need for help with activities of daily living has increased (long stay) (CMS)

17. Percent of residents who lose too much weight (long stay) (CMS)

18. Percent of residents who have depressive symptoms (long stay) (CMS)

19. Consumer Assessment of Health Providers and Systems (CAHPS) Nursing Home Survey: Discharged Resident Instrument (ARHQ)

20. Consumer Assessment of Health Providers and Systems (CAHPS) Nursing Home Survey: Long-Stay Resident Instrument (ARHQ)

21. Consumer Assessment of Health Providers and Systems (CAHPS) Nursing Home Survey: Family Member Instrument (ARHQ)

NQF is a voluntary consensus standards-setting organization. Any party may request reconsideration of the 21 endorsed recommendations, in whole or in part, by notifying NQF in writing no later than April 1.

For an appeal to be considered, the notification must include information clearly demonstrating the appellant has interests that are directly and materially affected by the NQF-endorsed recommendations and that the NQF decision has had (or will have) an adverse effect on those interests.

Click here to access the appeals form.

Topics

Comments

helping our seniors to age gracefully and pass away with due honor through provision of professional support in a standard facility have to be a scientific business and should be the collective responsibility of state and society. nursing and medical knowledge should be used in beneficial way for this very noble purpose.

I don't necessarily agree with the above. You MUST consider in long-term care residents the fact that EVENTUALLY they decline, don't want to eat, us in the field try everything possible to get them to eat, increase their appetites, etc., but they still lose weight as they are probbly on the late stages of their life (AND ARE NATURALLY DECLINING) so, what good is that particular indicator mean when we can't keep them at their MAXIMUM mental/physical health forever. Same with activities of daily living increasing as to need for help, and all the others which are totally the wrong way to review a person's health (physical/mental) status. By the way, I would say most people in a nursing facility, those getting old (including me at 76 and still running a nursing home & whose mother/brother were in one/both declined as their health status got worse and eventually died) get depression (generally, a normal part of the aging process, so you are looking at all the wrong things - except for seasonal flue vaccinations/etc. (that area which they should have), being physically restrained (we have zero rrestraints) & I am 76, still strong, in good health, don't have dementia/Alzheimers and plan to go back to Graduate School and get my Ph.D. possibly in Gerontology so there would be at LEAST ONE EXPERT in this business. Surveys of residents/families are often not accurate as is from a demented person's perspective (in many cases) and families often don't know how nursing facilities are suppose to run and their overwhelming challenges to stay within the regs (greatest in any business I know of). As to Pain Mgt., many of our older residents (NOT ME, HOWEVER), are put on too many medications (some as much as 30) which my father did at one time and it eventually lead to his death (ruined his stomach with so many down there mixing together, etc. and causing all the "fall out of ones reacting with others, etc.) so that our general population is now all drugged up and pain requests for meds. are often a part of that process and they get addicted to them - many cases in nursing facilities these days so that they will say they have pain just to get the meds. A sad case for our Society as a whole. So, why don't you look at things in a "logical/pragmatic way" vs. the stupid way which makes no sense as you state above? From An Administrator who is always looking out for the welfare of our residents and lead the way to a 5 STAR facility from a 1 STAR when she came here 3-1/2 yrs. ago to run the facility. DCM

How sad to not see the words "psychosocial well-being" on this list.
They included a nod to depression, but what about anxiety, adjustment and the range of mental health needs of the residents? Every aspect of nursing home life is an indicator of psychosocial well-being, from pain to food temperature. Where is the focus on dignity?
All hail the Social Service Department.....overlooked again. Thanks for letting me vent.

Pages