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Healthcare workers and the risk of needlestick injuries

August 23, 2013
by Sandra Hoban, Managing Editor
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More than half a million healthcare personnel experience needlestick injuries, resulting in personal distress and more than $1 billion in healthcare costs, according to U.S. healthcare statistics reviewed by Safe in Common (SIC), a nonprofit organization representing healthcare workers, industry leaders, scientists and policymakers.

SIC reviewed findings from the Massachusetts Sharps Injury Surveillance System and recent reports to estimate that nearly 1,000 percutaneous injuries occur each day, which resulted in treatment costs of nearly $3,042 per victim, including lab and testing fees for exposed employees, treatment, counseling and post-exposure follow-up care.

The report authors conclude that prevention is the best way to avoid costly exposure to blood and body fluids from needlestick injury.

SIC has called attention to this problem by issuing safety guidelines called “Top 10 Golden Rules of Safety.”