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FDA clears new tests to diagnose, treat vestibular disorder

February 2, 2016
by Nicole Stempak, Associate Editor
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A series of tests to help diagnose a vestibular disorder is one step closer to market.

The Food and Drug Administration has cleared the Positional and Oculomotor test batteries for the ICS Impulse. The modules are part of the OTOsuite VFestibular (OTOsuiteV) software platform manufactured by GN Otometrics.

The module tests for Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV). The new Oculomotor test battery helps determine if the disorder is central, peripheral or both. BPPV is the most prevalent vestibular disorder, but it can be difficult to diagnose.

"The Vestibular Disorders Association estimates that it can take between three to five years for a person with vestibular symptoms to receive a diagnosis," says Wendy Crumley-Welsh, audiologist and product manager at GN Otometrics in a press release. "What’s more, a person with a vestibular disorder will see, on average, between four to five doctors or specialists before receiving a proper diagnosis.

"With ICS Impulse, physicians have more affordable and practical options to help their patients who struggle with balance problems. This new solution will empower balance care professionals to reduce diagnosis and treatment times by making quality vestibular care accessible to more people who need it."

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