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An extra cup of coffee may ward off diabetes

May 20, 2014
by Sandra Hoban, Managing Editor
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Nearly 27 percent of people over 65 have some form of diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association, putting cardiovascular, cognitive and functional health at risk.

In a four-year study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), researchers found that increasing coffee intake by just one cup a day reduced the risk of Type 2 diabetes by 11 percent. The study also found that if coffee consumption was decreased, the risk of Type 2 diabetes increased by 17 percent.

For the study, a cup of coffee was defined as eight ounces, black or with a small amount of milk and/or sugar. The study also found that decaffeinated coffee and caffeinated tea consumption were not associated with changes in the risk for type 2 diabetes.

“These findings further demonstrate that, for most people, coffee may have health benefits. But coffee is only one of many factors that influence diabetes risk. More importantly, individuals should watch their weight and be physically active,” said Frank Hu, senior author and HSPH professor of nutrition and epidemiology at HSPH, in a release.

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