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Costs of stroke treatment may double by 2030

May 24, 2013
by Sandra Hoban, Managing Editor
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The costs associated with the treatment of strokes could double to $183 billion by 2030, according to a statement released by the American Heart Association earlier this week.

Caring for stroke victims is expensive because a stroke can result in a long-term disability, said Bruce Ovbiagele, MD, MSc, professor and chairman of the department of neurology at the Medical University of South Carolina, in the journal Stroke.

Among the reasons for this large increase in costs is the prediction that by 2030, nearly one in 25 U.S. adults will have a stroke. In addition, Americans who are now 45-64 years of age are expected to have a 5.1 percent increase in strokes.

“Strokes will absolutely strain the healthcare system. Ninety percent of stroke patients have residual disability and only 10 percent ever recover completely after a stroke,” Ovbiagele says.

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