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Census Bureau Releases Quick Stats on Elderly for Older Americans Month

April 26, 2011
by root
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A meeting with the National Council of Senior Citizens resulted in President John F. Kennedy designating May 1963 as Senior Citizens Month, encouraging the nation to pay tribute in some way to older people across the country. In 1980, President Jimmy Carter's proclamation changed the name to Older Americans Month, a time to celebrate those 65 and older through ceremonies, events and public recognition.

The U.S. Census Bureau has commemorated the observance of Older Americans Month this May by compiling the following stats on senior citizens.

39.6 million

The number of people 65 and older in the United States on July 1, 2009. This age group accounted for 13 percent of the total population. Between 2008 and 2009, this age group increased by 770,699 people.

88.5 million

Projected population of people 65 and older in 2050. People in this age group would comprise 20 percent of the total population at that time.

545 million

Projected 2011 midyear world population 65 and older. The number will increase to 1.55 billion by 2050. The percentage of the world's population 65 and older would increase from about 8 percent to about 17 percent over the period.

35

The projected number of people 65 and older to every 100 people of traditional working ages (ages 20 to 64) in 2030, up from 22 in 2010. This time period coincides with the time when baby boomers are moving into the 65 and older age category.

42%

The percentage of the 65 and older population expected to be a minority—i.e., a group other than single race, non-Hispanic white—in 2050, more than double the percentage in 2010 (20 percent). Likewise, among those 85 and older, 33 percent are projected to be a minority in 2050, up from 15 percent in 2010. (The figures for 2010 are not census counts.)

$31,354

Median 2009 income of households with householders 65 and older, up 5.8 percent, in real terms, from the previous year. The corresponding median for all households was $49,777.

8.9%

Poverty rate for people 65 and older in 2009, down from 9.7 percent in 2008. There were 3.4 million seniors in poverty in 2009, down from 3.7 million the previous year. The corresponding rate for the population as a whole was 14.3 percent.

9 million

Estimated number of people 65 and older who were veterans of the armed forces in 2009.

6.5 million

Number of people 65 and older who were in the labor force in 2009. Projections indicate that by 2018, the number will reach 11.1 million.

55%

The percentage who worked full-time among people 65 and older who were employed in 2009.

42%

The percentage working in management, professional and related occupations among employed people 65 and older.

16%

Percentage of people 65 and older in the labor force in 2009.

77%

Proportion of people 65 and older in 2009 who had completed high school or higher education.

20%

Percentage of the population 65 and older in 2009 who had earned a bachelor's degree or higher.

56%

Percentage of people 65 and older who were married in 2010.

66%

Percentage of people 65 and older in households in 2009 who lived with relatives. Twenty-seven percent of all people this age lived alone, while 5 percent lived in group quarters and 2 percent in a household with nonrelatives.

70%

Percentage of citizens 65 and older reporting casting a ballot in the 2008 presidential election. Along with those 45 to 64, people 65 and older had the highest turnout rate of any age group.

81%

Percentage of householders 65 and older who owned their homes as of 4th quarter 2010.

74

The number of men 65 and older on July 1, 2009, for every 100 women in this age group. For those 85 and older, it drops to 46 men per 100 women.

5.6 million

The number of people 85 and older in the United States on July 1, 2009.

71,991

Estimated number of centenarians in the United States on Dec. 1, 2010.

601,000

Projected number of centenarians in the United States in 2050.

4.1 million

Number of people 65 and older living in California on July 1, 2009, the highest total of any state. Florida, with 3.2 million, and New York, with 2.6 million, were the runners-up.

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Comments

As usual, the government has issued useless information. As a long term care provider for 30 plus years, the average age of our new residents is generally over 85. Even back in 1980 when I started the average age was in the low to mid 70s.

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