Skip to content Skip to navigation
Printer-friendly version


 


Monday, April 30, 2012 | 7:30 a.m. – 8:25 a.m.

Breakfast Session
B01
Innovation + Design = Sensational Showers – What’s old, is new again and then some!

Doug Westmoreland, VP of Business Development, Mincey Marble Manufacturing, Inc.

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 7:30 a.m. – 8:25 a.m.

As we challenge the definition of senior living, we must also challenge the design of the environment they will be living in. Not only will the incoming wave of baby boomers demand the latest technologies be included in these designs to enhance their daily lives, they will also expect that those designs will help to keep them safe, secure, and healthy. One design change that is evident is that tubs are out and showers of all shapes and sizes are in.  In this session, attendees will be given insight into the latest innovation, types of materials, and various products that are available in the design of today’s bathrooms, more specifically showers, including the infusion of antimicrobial technology.


Monday, April 30, 2012 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.


Track: Codes, Standards and Other Considerations

E01
Exploring Basic Research in Universal Design—A Tour of What’s Happening in Japan - NEW!
Gunnar Baldwin, Water Efficiency Specialist, TOTO USA

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

The presentation will discuss what was visited and what was learned by 17 architects, professors and designers specializing in Universal Design during a four day visit to Yokohama, Chigasaki and Tokyo in September of 2010 (sponsored by TOTO USA with assistance from parent company, TOTO Ltd. in Japan). The presenter will share findings of original research taking place at TOTO’s Universal Design Research Center and other technical centers in this region of Japan. Participants will view an array of photographs taken by members of the trip the illuminate research findings and best universal design practices.  

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Successful Remodeling and Repositioning
E02
A Review of 2010–2011: Long-Term Living's Remodel-Renovation Competition
Andrew L. Alden, Market Leader: Living Environments, eppstein uhen architects

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

The Annual (online) Remodel-Renovation Competition, sponsored by Vendome and SAGE, generates many projects competing for attention that are unseen by the general public, but have noteworthy aspects that can inspire renovation projects however big or small. This presentation will highlight winners from the previous two years as well as projects worthy of note. Attendees will meet the individuals involved in these various projects, explore renovation ideas from a variety of environments for aging and identify renovations with construction costs ranging from a few hundred dollars to the thousands. In addition to benchmarking these best practices, you will also learn about the competition submission process and key aspects to include in your own submission.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Expanded Environments for Aging

E03
Lessons From Theme Parks—Influencing the Design of Senior Communities
Jack Carman, FASLA, RLA, CAPS, President, Design for Generations, LLC
Nancy Carman, Director of Geriatric Care Management, SeniorWise Care Management
Ismael Ranzola, Senior Landscape Architect, Walt Disney Imagineering (WDI)

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Entertainment-based theme parks, such as Disney World, Universal Studios and Great Adventure, are designed to accommodate the needs of all ages, including older adults. Through use of state-of-the-art universal design concepts that go beyond bricks and mortar, these outdoor physical environments provide critical benchmarks for how the aging population can effortlessly navigate their environments, and can teach professionals in senior housing communities how to offer environments that help seniors feel secure and independent. Participants will analyze elements that comprise effective park settings, learn how those concepts translate into senior communities and discover how certain design elements are universal to all settings.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Aging in Place

E04
Surplus Safety—When Safety Does Harm
Judah L. Ronch, PhD, Dean of the Erickson School at UMBC, Baltimore, Maryland
William H. Thomas, MD, Founder, Changing Aging; Founder, The Eden Alternative and Green House Project
Margaret Calkins, PhD, CAPS, EDAC, President, I.D.E.A.S., Inc.

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Many people who desire to stay at “home” find themselves in an environment that is not well suited to the challenges of the functional adaptations of aging. One of the ways these environments are often modified is with “safety” in mind. But what is safety? Too often, family and professional caregivers add features intended to keep a person safe but which, by restricting movement, cognitive challenge or engagement, can create excess disability and undermine function. In this session we will examine how, by understanding the individual rather than framing issues only through the lens of the diagnosis, environments for people with dementia do not have to be overly restrictive in the name of safety. Balancing conditions that promote upside risk, not only downside risk, is a way to prevent a condition called “surplus safety.”

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Case Studies Leading Change

E05
How You Gonna Keep ‘Em Down on the Farm? A Rural Age-In-Place Community for Developmentally Disabled Adults and Their Caregivers
Richard Rosen, AIA LEED AP, Principal, Perkins Eastman
John Baring, Trustee, Camphill Ghent Initiative

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

The Camphill Foundation has a century-long tradition of supporting and caring for developmentally disabled children. Its community in Copake, New York, has been a structured and nurturing environment for almost 60 years, guided by the principles of Rudolf Steiner and anthroposophical philosophy. These “children” are now approaching the age where options for a variety of levels of senior living and care are needed. The Camphill Ghent Initiative was established to create such a community on a 110-acre farm in Columbia County, New York, where developmentally disabled adults would be able to age in place in an environment that allows them to maintain independence, while providing services and assisted living-level care when needed. Independent senior housing is also provided for able-bodied seniors who wish to be a part of the caregiving staff as well as participate in the community’s cultural and agricultural offerings.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Future-Focused Models

E06
Concept to Construction—Designing an International Standard SNF in China
David Green, Director of Conceptual Planning and Development, China Senior Care
Mark Spitalnik, President and CEO, China Senior Care, Inc.
Jane Rohde, Principle, JSR Associates
J. David Hoglund, FAIA, Principal and Director, Perkins Eastman

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

For three years, China Senior Care has been preparing to construct the first of many 40-resident SNFs using the household/neighborhood model. This session highlights their process for providing the highest international standard required, starting with a vision of the best quality of life for each elder. Presenters will identify the benefit of beginning the design of an SNF by focusing on the normal activities of elders, and will highlight the appropriateness of using a wellness philosophy rather than an acute- care illness philosophy. Attendees will explore the opportunities and challenges in designing SNFs in the greenfield of China, and discover the universal factors of person-centered SNF environmental design through designing for Chinese elders.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Roundtable Discussions

R01
Small Projects, Big Impact on Culture Change
Rick Moore, AIA, ACHA, Principal, Horty Elving
Christine Soma, Project Designer, Horty Elving

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

In tough economic times, positioning your facility to care for generations into the future relies on sound decisions regarding reimbursement rates, as well as the ability to attract residents and talented staff. This highly interactive discussion group will focus on financially feasible ways to use small projects to create significant changes in your building that support culture change. Participants will take away an understanding that small projects, if strategically done, can support significant transformation to change the culture, and support overall positive changes in the lives of residents and staff. Participants will leave with concrete ideas about their respective facilities and how to simultaneously optimize care and reimbursement.

Back to Top | Agenda


Monday, April 30, 2012 | 9:45 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.


Track: Codes, Standards and Other Considerations

E07
Regulatory Change and Culture Change—Working Together
Margaret Calkins, PhD, CAPS, EDAC, President, I.D.E.A.S., Inc.
Robert Mayer, President, Hulda B. and Maurice L. Rothschild Foundation

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 9:45 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

Regulations are often cited as either a real or perceived barrier to culture change. Since 2004, the Hulda B. and Maurice L. Rothschild Foundation has worked to build bridges of understanding with the regulatory community around the country, in order to craft regulations that are more supportive of self-directed, relationship-based care. Learn how several national task forces are actively working on a number of initiatives to help create a regulatory environment more strongly supportive of culture change. Recent changes to the National Life Safety Code (2012), a review of NH Regs Plus, ADA revisions, and proposed changes for the 2014 Guidelines for the Design and Construction of Health Care Facilities will be discussed. The dialogue will also focus on future regulatory initiatives.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Successful Remodeling and Repositioning

E08
Medical Miracles—Converting Medical Models of Care Into Modern Miracles
Gregg Scott, Partner, RLPS Architects
Eric McRoberts, Partner, RLPS Architects

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 9:45 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

The vast majority of CCRCs, nursing homes, assisted living facilities and hospitals consist of medical model design solutions based upon staff efficiency, with little sensitivity to residents’ needs and wants. Fortunately, these facilities lend themselves to creative conversion into contemporary, inviting and residentially focused, reinvented healthcare facilities for an aging population. Through case studies, presenters will demonstrate conversion design solutions for skilled care and assisted living, and conversion of hospital wings into hospice care. Attendees will learn that conversion opportunities exist, regardless of existing structures and the location of bearing walls, and will view reinvented accommodations with spacious living quarters and closets, contemporary bathrooms, natural light and in-room dining.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Expanded Environments for Aging

E09
Outdoor Spaces—Effective Design for Older Adults
Clare Cooper Marcus, Professor Emerita, University of California, Berkeley

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 9:45 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

Many outdoor spaces in senior facilities are barely used. This session will illustrate what design features are essential to draw people outdoors—a significant environment for exercise and overall well-being. Several case studies of existing gardens will illustrate how such features were—or were not—successfully incorporated into outdoor space design.
Attendees will understand what design elements attract older people to use the outdoors, and will explore in detail the pros and cons of two case study communities. You’ll discover what design features are essential in a garden for Alzheimer’s residents and learn about essential indoor-outdoor connections.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Aging in Place

E10
Planning, Designing and Managing Cooperatives for Senior Living
Barbara Murphy, Director of Marketing, Better Performance LLC
Jack Bowersox, Manager, Life Wellness Communities Development Company, LLC
Jeffrey Lantto, Director of Homeowner Associations, Ebenezer Management Services

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 9:45 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

This session defines the co-op for seniors, its rationale for healthy aging, wellness and cognition, marketing strategies, themes to anticipate in management and the resulting opportunities for design, and the role of technologies for anticipating change. Participants will share the experience of 7500 York—a 30-year-old co-op—and gain insights from similarly conceived projects ranging in size, locale and economics. They will hear a discussion of the implications of the cooperative model for leveraging programs, services and wellness programs to nonoccupants. They will develop a set of tools that are valuable for private and experienced nonprofit sponsors, designers and financial organizations, and learn how current practices in successful senior cooperatives can be translated for practice in other forms of senior community living.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Case Studies Leading Change

E11
Living in the Garden Cottage—What Have We Learned?
Alan Moore, AIA, Principal, CJMW Architecture
Beth Faircloth, Interior Designer, Garden Cottage at Penick Village

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 9:45 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

The Penick Village Garden Cottage, a free-standing home for 10 assisted living residents, opened in early 2010. The first project of its type to be built in North Carolina, the Garden Cottage is also a pioneer with its LEED Silver Certification under the new LEED for Homes designation. The principal architect and interior designer for the Cottage will discuss lessons learned now that the home has been open for more than a year.Incorporating feedback from residents, staff and administration, they will discuss what worked, what did not work and, most importantly, how to apply those lessons in future projects.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Future-Focused Models

E12
The Challenge of Offering Choice—How to Meet the Design Desires of the New Senior Market
John Swanson, President/Partner, Willow Valley Retirement Management/Creative Construction Solutions LLC
Bill Koch, President, Creative Construction Solutions, LLC
Kim Nobbs Evans, Principal, Prajna Partners LLC
Mary Cook, President and Founder, Mary Cook & Associates

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 9:45 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

A common struggle in meeting the needs of a changing senior living marketplace is overcoming the perception that offering design choice necessarily adds cost and significantly slows down building or renovation processes. In this session, participants will learn why offering choice remains critical and how it can be accomplished. Presenters will offer actionable ideas for how to: (1) select a set of standard finishes that makes choice more available; (2) create a smooth-running option selection system; (3) handle special design requests; and (4) create a system that keeps choice from being a dirty word to construction managers.The strategies presented will offer insights on how embracing choice can be a win-win for all.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Roundtable Discussions

R02
Privacy As a Lived Experience—Variations in the Ways Patients Make Meaning of Privacy
Susan Mazer, President and CEO, Healing HealthCare Systems

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 9:45 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

This roundtable presents the results of a 2009–2010 study looking at how privacy is lived at the bedside and the different ways it is experienced. This phenomenographic study included interviews with 14 subjects (ranging in age from 63 to 96), who had been hospitalized in the past 36 months. The discussion will provide an overview of patient privacy historically, as an ethic, and as it is now understood through the lens of HIPAA regulations, practices and policies. Attendees will discuss study results and their implications, and gain insight into factors that can influence privacy policies and practices to improve the quality of care and resident/patient satisfaction.

Back to Top | Agenda


Monday, April 30, 2012 | 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.


Track: Codes, Standards and Other Considerations

E13
Changing the Code in Resident Care Bathroom Accessibility
Quinn deMenna, AIA, Consulting Architect
Jon Sanford, Director, Center for Assistive Technology and Environmental Access and Associate Professor, Georgia Tech

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

ADA Accessibility Guidelines are based on antiquated standards that are largely inappropriate for aging residents with mobility disabilities. This presentation reports the efforts of the AIA Design for Aging Committee, who seeks to change the ADA through the U.S. Federal Government Access Board and through ANSI. Presenters will demonstrate how existing regulations lead to design solutions that have a negative impact on the quality of life and safety of both residents and staff. Research will be presented that has assessed the effectiveness of current guidelines for transfer mobility in common bathing fixtures. Recommendations will be made for changes in codes based on recent research, resulting in more appropriate resident bathroom design that has a positive impact upon the privacy and choices available to residents, their ability to be more independent, and provide greater safety among the residents and staff.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Successful Remodeling and Repositioning

E14
Design and Repositioning CCRCs for Social Curiosity, Vitality and Preciousness of Time
Lorraine Hiatt, PhD, Environmental Gerontology; Consultant, Environmental Design and Aging

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

How do we evoke the independence of independent living? This session interprets new user and use data to stimulate appealing, yet flexible CCRC commons design. New data on the characteristics and patterns of use will be summarized and applied to design implications for social/dining, fitness and niche interests. Innovations in self and peer-mentored memory and vigor will also be introduced. Participants will acquire planning tools that are applicable to new facilities and renovation, and which are drawn from high and lower cost examples, various climates, age profiles and self-described energy levels. Options include expanded use for nonoccupant, intergenerational and retail use. Illustrations will include imagery, size criteria and adjacencies contributing to an overall vision for aging.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Expanded Environments for Aging

E15
Repositioning Wellness and Rehabilitation—A Case Study
Mark Strautman, President and CEO, Three Pillars Senior Living Communities
Larry Schneider, Project Executive and Associate, Plunkett Raysich Architects

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

“Design and build a state-of-the-art short-term rehabilitation unit and gym, while offering an integrated wellness facility and program that will keep your residents and the community at large coming back for more.” This was the charge given to the project team at Three Pillars at the start of a wellness and rehabilitation project. This case study illuminates a future-focused wellness model, outlines the architectural challenges faced and how the outcomes of this project continue to exceed expectations one year later. Participants will learn about the unique drivers of the Wellness Connection that serves inpatient, outpatient, and visitors and has a viable connection to the community.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Aging-in-Place

E16
Aging-in-Place at Home and Environmental Support of Physical Activity
Zhe Wang, PhD, RA, EDAC, LEED AP BD+C, Cannon Design
Mardelle Shepley, D.Arch, FAIA, EDAC, LEED AP, Professor, Center for Health Systems & Design, Texas A&M University
Susan Rodiek, PhD, NCARB, Associate Professor, Center for Health Systems & Design, Texas A&M University

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Can society help community-dwelling older adults have more independent years in their own homes? This session interprets and synthesizes existing studies on aging-in-place in relation to health and services. It describes the nature of the aging process and the impact of physical activity on health and service accessibility, and therefore, the ability for seniors to remain in their homes. Physical environments that provide opportunities for physical activity at the neighborhood level and the site level will be presented, along with a conceptual framework to serve as the core construct to address gaps in previous research, and as a tool to refine practical targets for policies and innovations aimed at promoting seniors’ independence and wellness.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Case Studies Leading Change

E17
Designing Refuge—Creating Environments for Palliative Care
Ila Burdette, AIA, LEED BD+C, Principal, Perkins+Will

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

The challenge of hospice care is to encourage terminally ill patients and their families at their most difficult moments. This session demonstrates the ways designers can provide a sense of refuge by creatively selecting building masses and materials that are both intriguing and familiar. Attendees will consider the means to personalize patient rooms by enabling individual control (e.g., shades, fans, lighting, alternate bed locations), by de-institutionalizing necessary medical features, and by providing livable space and storage allowances. The presentation also studies ways to create synergies between indoor and outdoor stress-relieving spaces. The benefits of strategic glazing to daylight spaces, to frame outdoor views, and to enhance wayfinding and orientation are illustrated.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Future-Focused Models

E18
Managing Behaviors in Dementia—Environment and Programs United
Dr. Lena Smith, Clinical Director, The Retreat

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

This interactive session will provide an in-depth overview of dementia and the underlying cognitive skills that are lost during the disease process. It will then focus on the intersection of specialized environments and care programs, highlighting and demonstrating the enhancement to care when both domains are integrated. Participants will examine photographs of cluster areas that achieve this integration, and they will be challenged to evaluate dining rooms, bathing areas, bedrooms, window access and outdoor spaces within the context of dementia as an underlying disease process. Quality-of-life and outcomes-of-care programs will be explored.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Roundtable Discussions

R03
Methods to Reduce Risks for Patient Falls and Staff Injuries
Dr. Edgar Ramos Vieira, Florida International University, Department of Physical Therapy

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Resident and patient falls and staff injuries are interrelated and associated with the design of long-term care and healthcare facilities. By using mixed-methods research, it is possible to identify the risks for these issues. By involving patients and staff members, it is possible to gather information on setting and context-specific issues and potential improvements that should be considered for the optimum design of facilities. This roundtable discussion will present these approaches with a high-level of participant discussion. The methods used will be described and practiced to allow their implementation by the participants.

Back to Top | Agenda


Monday, April 30, 2012 | 3:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.


Track: Codes, Standards and Other Considerations

E19
Creating Aging-Friendly Green Communities
Jane Rohde, AIA, FIIDA, ACHA, AAHID, Principal, JSR Associates, Inc.
Elizabeth (Betsy) Brawley, AAHID, IIDA, CID, Principal, Design Concepts Unlimited

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 3:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.

Efficient, affordable homes contribute to environmentally sustainable communities. Healthier living environments, both inside and outside the home, improve quality of life for people as they age. This program will posit a definition of sustainable communities and outline the process for creating them. Attendees will consider the key attributes of sustainable communities, including smart growth features, and understand how to discuss creating these communities with clients, organizations and end users. The presentation will conclude with a review of the new tool for renovation or new senior living projects, and learn about updates to the 2014 cycle of the Guidelines for Design and Construction of Health Care Facilities.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Successful Remodeling and Repositioning

E20
Highways or Hallways–Extreme Makeovers of Senior Living Corridors
Carol Reitter Elia, ASID, LEED AP, President and Principal Designer, CR DESIGN

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 3:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.

Hallways come in all shapes and sizes. But what happens when clients want to adopt culture change without changing the architecture of the medical model? This session highlights how to make drastic improvements to the hallways in senior living environments, without significant change to the existing structure. Focusing on illustrated visuals and case studies from skilled nursing and memory support corridors, attendees will identify the challenges and their solutions. Because every project has unique issues, attendees will look at interior “roadwork” that can be performed to improve the “highway” system when the budget is tight, culture change is desired and the architecture just will not budge!

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Expanded Environments for Aging

E21
Collaborations and Considerations in the Development of Healing Environments - NEW
Connie Roy-Fisher, ASLA, RLA, MLA, LEED AP, Principal, Studio Sprout
Amy Wagenfeld, PhD, OTR/L, CAPS, Program Development, Studio Sprout

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 3:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.

Forty top healthcare executives involved in Cultural Transformations in Healthcare, a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation study, identified patient centered environments of healing as their number one priority. This presentation explores how patient centered care and evidence based design informs healthcare site design of therapeutic gardens and the importance of a collaborative and integrated team of clinician, designers, and researchers in designing these spaces.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Aging-in-Place

E22
The Co-Housing Model—Design for Affordability and Healthy Aging
Charles Durrett, AIA, NCARB, Principal Architect, McCamant & Durrett Architects

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 3:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.

The session will describe senior co-housing communities as an alternative to institutionalized housing and retirement communities, and as an alternative to living isolated in a single-family house. Co-housing communities are custom neighborhoods designed and developed with the future residents and would include individually owned, private residences combined with commonly shared facilities (including a central kitchen, laundry room, guest rooms, a lounge and workshop spaces). Participants will learn about the key components of the 120-existing co-housing models in the U.S., and hear about the increase of senior co-housing designed for the needs and interests of an active adult group.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Case Studies Leading Change

E23
Relational Design—The Household Connection
Mitchell Elliott, Chief Development Officer, Vetter Health Services, Inc.

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 3:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.

This case study will explore the quality results of a connected version of household design in Southlake Village, a short-term rehab and long-term care facility completed in July 2011. This case study will review the journey involved in transitioning from a traditional nursing home to a new household-based model, and include findings from a post-occupancy review performed six months after Southlake Village’s opening. The presenter will discuss the role that mission, vision and values have in driving design, and explore key design and operational components. Challenges inherent in the transition will be discussed, along with considerations for improving the process and end results of future projects.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Future-Focused Models

E24
Engage Residents, Cut Costs and Boost Marketability—The Business Case for Going Green
Aaron D'Costa, Chief Business Development Officer, Pathway Senior Living

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 3:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.

"Going green" has been a trend for the past decade. So what are you waiting for? Participants in this session will learn a no-nonsense approach for developing or renovating a “green community” with features that improve residents’ lives, ease the burden of operating costs and improve the community’s marketability. Learn first-hand how one owner/operator has implemented green design and green operations to positively impact resident satisfaction, employee morale and operating costs. See examples of other green techniques implemented in senior living communities around the country. Cut through the clutter of the gimmicks and the expensive “wow-factor” ideas to learn what clients (owners/operators) really want and need.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Roundtable Discussions

R04
New Models for Independent Senior’s Housing
Eric S. McRoberts, AIA, Partner, RLPS Architects-Planning-Architecture-Interior Design

Monday, April 30, 2012 | 3:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.

Those serving today’s elderly consumers must continually look beyond traditional models and seek new and better housing options. This roundtable discussion will share lessons learned from new models for senior housing and explore opportunities for innovative design solutions that respect today’s economic realities while improving the quality of life for our aging population. Attendees will discuss new directions in senior housing which run counter to common assumptions and will together explore these new options and be challenged to formulate new concepts that will enable providers to remain relevant in today’s economic and market realities.

Back to Top | Agenda


Tuesday, May 1, 2012 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.


Track: Innovative Housing Models

E25
Community Integration and New Urbanism in the Senior Housing Community
Thomas Gears, AIA, Principal, SWBR Architecture, Engineering & Landscape Architecture, P.C.
Duncan Walker, AIA, LEED AP, Vice President, BROWN | CRAIG | TURNER

Tuesday, May 1, 2012 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Why is there a push for the New Urbanism? To end the isolation of elders and create real communities that fit perfectly with a community’s integration goal of having CCRC residents rejoin the community. This session will highlight a case study at St. John’s Brickstone that exemplifies the concept behind the marriage of new urbanism and the integration of seniors with the community. Presenters will outline new urbanism principles and the business case that supports them. Attendees will obtain information about mixed-use senior communities and community outreach, and discover how to expand the continuum of care and establish strong community connectivity with new urbanist design principles in mind.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Successful Remodeling and Repositioning

E26
Low-Impact Conversions—Renovations That Expand Services to Increase Occupancy Rates
Kristopher Tiernan, AIA, LEED AP, Associate/Project Manager, JSA Inc.

Tuesday, May 1, 2012 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Senior living communities are looking for ways to accommodate changing demographics, increase resident and family satisfaction and expand services without the capital expenditures associated with breaking new ground. A good way to diversify is to convert existing, under-occupied living unit types to new, more profitable models that can expand residents’ options and enable them to stay within their chosen community. This design/client team will share case studies showcasing the lessons learned from executing independent living to assisted living and assisted living to Alzheimer’s care conversions, and the economic impact these conversions have on the long-term financial success of those communities.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Expanded Environments for Aging

E27
Let’s Do It Outside—A SAGE Panel Discussion on the Benefits of Going “Au Naturel”
Addie Abushousheh, Secretary and Treasurer, SAGE Federation
Margaret Calkins, Co-Founder, SAGE Federation
Elizabeth Brawley, Board of Directors, SAGE Federation
Alanna Carter, President, SAGE Minnesota

Tuesday, May 1, 2012 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Join SAGE for a panel discussion about the use of outdoor spaces—not just as pretty gardens, but as activity centers. There is an increasing interest in focusing on utilizing outdoor space as an extension of the buildings themselves. This panel will challenge the commonly held notion that people will go outside to look at beautiful flowers, and stress the needs for activity, things to do and staff engagement. This session will explore the relationship of the inside to the outside spaces that may be capitalized upon if they are conceived of as outdoor rooms, providing an opportunity for year-round activity as well as many health-related benefits.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Aging-in-Place

E28
Design Intervention—Moving Beyond Age for Better Design
Lori Bitter, President and CEO, Continuum Crew; President and CEO, Crew Media

Tuesday, May 1, 2012 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

This session will debut new research from AARP and the Move Beyond Age coalition (comprised of individuals, companies, nonprofits, associations, media and academia, who are dedicated to bringing consumer insights into the design of products and services earlier, recognizing the significance of aging populations and promoting the idea that good design is better for every generation). This session will share insights from 800,000+ boomer consumers and evaluations of 40+ products, will posit how these insights can inform new environments for the aging and uphold design as a key quality-of-life factor at every level of our society, particularly as we age.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Case Studies Leading Change

E29
44 Facilities, 1,553 Beds, 3 Years—A Case Study from Nova Scotia
Benjie Nycum, CEO, William Nycum & Associates Limited
Stephen Terauds, Manager of Innovation & Research, William Nycum & Associates Limited

Tuesday, May 1, 2012 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

For three years, the government of the province of Nova Scotia has been designing and building 1,553 continuing care (skilled nursing) beds in 44 new facilities. This has been an immense initiative for a population of less than one million people. The new facilities are based on the household model, requiring a system-wide culture change. This seminar will outline this multi-faceted initiative and describe Nova Scotia’s design standards for skilled nursing projects. It will highlight unexpected factors that threatened to undermine the new standards and major decisions that had significant capital cost, operations and quality-of-life impacts. It will also examine the variety of outcomes in spite of a strict implementation of a single design standard for all 44 facilities.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Future-Focused Technologies

E30
Integrating Technology and Memory Care Design and Programming
Shelley Esden, Senior Vice President of Operations, Sonata Senior Living
Lisa Childers, Lifestyle Director, Serenades by Sonata

Tuesday, May 1, 2012 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Whether or not you attended the tour of Sonata Senior Living’s memory care assisted living, Serenades by Sonata community, this session will demonstrate firsthand the power that technology has in increasing the quality of life. From interactive SMARTboards to Apple TVs, Serenades by Sonata’s purpose-built memory-care assisted living utilizes technology to create direct connections between families and residents, and between residents to the vast resources of the web. From motion detectors to podcasts, learn how technology can be integrated into senior living design and programming to enhance person-directed care and partnerships with families.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Roundtable Discussions

R05
Speaking Intergenerationally—Restorative Design and  Lifespan Engagement

Randy Eady, Therapeutic Specialist, Member of International Council on Active Aging, US Play Coalition, TaiChi4Health and Generations United

Tuesday, May 1, 2012 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

More and more generations are overlapping in senior living. CCRCs are finding if they have a better appreciation for the changing demographics coming into their midst, they can better position offerings that meet this variety and create enticing, eco-aware and highly-functional living environments.  Multiple-generation interaction and physical activity enhances quality of life for older adults; adding outdoor settings and children to the mix magnifies these benefits. Unfortunately, myths and assumptions about these types activities -- across the life span -- may limit opportunities to create optimal design features that consider both eco-psychological and recreational therapy aspects.  This roundtable explores opportunities for "intergenerational programming" that build relationships between the natural environment, youth and older people.  Participants will explore seven prevailing barriers to Lifespan Engagement (health and sense of well-being across generations and natural physical environments).

Back to Top | Agenda


Tuesday, May 1, 2012 | 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.


Track: Innovative Housing Models

E31
Accessory Dwelling Units as Affordable Housing for Seniors
Emory Baldwin, Principal Architect, FabCab
Karen Harris, AIA, Architect, Architecture Matters

Tuesday, May 1, 2012 | 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Accessory dwelling units (ADUs) offer an affordable and appropriate housing option for aging-in-place. These small, affordable dwellings can help accommodate the changing needs of households, while providing an independent environment for those who live in them. Demand for these structures is growing, and many municipalities across the country have adopted zoning changes to allow and even encourage them. Attendees will discover how the universal design and independence that ADUs offer can be a practical alternative to institutionalized senior housing and enhance the quality of life. Learn about typical ADU-zoning regulations, their effects on existing neighborhoods and their potential influence on community resources.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Successful Remodeling and Repositioning

E32
Town Center or Ghost Town—Designing Successful Social Spaces
Rick Moore, AIA, ACHA, Principal, Horty Elving
Christine Soma, Project Designer, Horty Elving

Tuesday, May 1, 2012 | 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

In the age of private rooms, town center spaces are sometimes underutilized in some communities, and are a center for vibrant social life in others. This session examines the factors contributing to a town center’s success or failure, drawing from several case study projects and research. Participants will explore the impact of a community’s population and acuity level on town center usage, and suggest ways to optimize the use of social space in different situations. They will explore a variety of examples—from facilities that have gone from shared rooms to private rooms to those that have built a new, all-private facility, focusing on the usage of social spaces.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Expanded Environments for Aging

E33
The Heart Healthy Garden
Lydia Kimball, ASLA, LEED AP BD+C, Principal, Mahan Rykiel Associates, Inc.
Robin Spence, Dietitian for Cardiovascular Services, Union Memorial Hospital

Tuesday, May 1, 2012 | 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

The health benefits of engaging the outdoors in facilities for seniors are well-documented and especially important as issues of medication, mobility and emotional welfare can be affected in positive and tangible ways. This presentation will bring cardiac nutrition and landscape architecture together to showcase opportunities for thoughtfully created outdoor space. Presenters will showcase a prototype space and describe the ways it might be improved. Using a MedStar facility as a case study, presenters will illustrate a concept layout, ways to connect to the existing facility, design elements that could be incorporated, budget cost estimates and then present a graphic tool to help with potential fundraising.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Aging in Place

E34
Home for the Next 50 Years
John Salmen, AIA, NCARB, President, Universal Designers & Consultants Inc.

Tuesday, May 1, 2012 | 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

This case study shares the first-hand experience of John Salmen and the story of how he designed and built a universally designed home so that he and his wife could live in a home that was safe, easy-to-use and offered future design option choices as they aged. Presenters will offer insights into the flexibility of universal design and its usefulness for families of all ages, and will present design concepts, details and materials, and discuss the dos and don’ts of universal design. Participants will also discuss how universal design can be applied to retrofit conditions within a historical context.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Case Studies Leading Change

E35
From Data to Design—Shaping Long-Term Care From Benchmarks to Lessons Learned
Barbara Miszkiel, Principal, Stantec
Sharon Woodworth, Associate Principal, Stantec

Tuesday, May 1, 2012 | 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

This session will highlight research, benchmarks and lessons learned from long-term care facilities across the U.S. and Canada, present design solutions from concept to built work and describe best practices at any stage in the design process. Three case studies will be compared and contrasted to emphasize how benchmarks can be applied to traditional skilled nursing and high-acuity facilities. Each benchmark is derived from a large database from research conducted by The Center for Health Design, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and extensive in-depth tours. More than 20 completed projects will demonstrate the full range of design concepts and options available, with lessons learned about what does and does not work.

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Future-Focused Technologies

E36
From the Fun House to the Smart House—Integrating Adaptive and Smart House Technologies Into Your Community
Roger Booker,Executive Vice President, WellAWARE Systems
Jack York, CEO and Co-founder, It's Never 2 Late

Tuesday, May 1, 2012 | 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Technology is moving into the field of aging at a rapid pace. This presentation will highlight how technology, if driven from a person-centered standpoint, can dramatically improve the quality of life of the residents you serve, as well as their families and your staff. Participants will gain insights into two distinct types of technologies that can be seamlessly integrated: (1) adaptive, person-centered technologies that open the world for older adults with physical and cognitive disabilities and (2) noninvasive sensors (under a “smart house” concept) that are able to monitor the day-to-day activities of older adults living in assisted living communities or at home. The session, geared towards nontechnical individuals, will illuminate an array of innovative technologies that will be in demand tomorrow!

Back to Top | Agenda



Track: Roundtable Discussions

R06
Perpetual Planning—A Tool to Insure a Community’s Future
Patrick Brady, LNHA, CEO, Heath Alliance for Care, Inc.
David Danton, AIA, PP, Principal, KDA Architects

Tuesday, May 1, 2012 | 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

A master plan is often created by a community to accomplish a single “extreme makeover.” It can, however, become a long-term effort to keep administration, staff and trustees focused on a process of continuous self-examination, visions of the future and a road map for implementation. One example of this is Health Village, which for the past 15 years has succeeded in keeping the campus competitive and vibrant by using self-evaluation and master planning as tools for long-range campus improvement. Through examination of this case study and facilitated brainstorming, this roundtable will equip attendees with the tools to make the process of long-term master planning possible at other campuses.

Back to Top | Agenda