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Monday, April 8 | 8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

Track: Advancements Across the Continuum of Care

E01  Elder-friendly Design—The Impact on the Evolution of Acute Care
Laurie Placinski, IIDA, LEED AP, EDAC, Interior Project Designer, Progressive AE

Monday, April 8 | 8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

This session will facilitate a better understanding of how the convergence of aging baby boomers, along with changes from the Affordable Care Act, will drastically impact how acute care facilities operate and how design can influence a successful transformation. It explores emerging demand trends and discusses how large healthcare systems are responding by creating elder-friendly, geriatric-focused environments and practices. A case study of an operational geriatric-focused progressive unit will be shared, with key lessons learned in creating a healthcare envirionment and processes that are specific to the physical, emotional, and social needs of this demographic.

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Track: Emerging Trends Leading Change
E02  New Opportunities in Design for Aging—Are You Tooled Up?
Lorraine G. Hiatt, PhD, Environmental Gerontologist, Planning, Research and Design Consultation
Ron Blitch, FAIA, FACHA, President, Blitch Knevel Architects

Monday, April 8 | 8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

The design for an aging marketplace is an area poised for growth. Does your design team have the tools necessary to respond to economic realities, global trends, and new questions about aging in place? These presenters will outline current questions and the types of information required to expedite your efforts, from proposal to project results. Highlights will include new and repositioned spaces, energizing environments, layouts that evoke physical competence, and features that tweak senses and coax mental competencies. Examples demonstrate a significant shift away from "design for the old" attitudes and offer evidence-based choices in programming and planning and provide references, marketing sources, and approval strategies.

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Track: Innovations in Technology and Design
E03  Independent Living—Bricks, Mortar, and a Whole Lot More!
Susan Wright, AIA, LEED AP, Architect, Gruzen Samton—IBI Group Architects
Dorothy Kern, Licensed Real Estate Broker & NYS Realtor, Managing Director of Real Estate, Selfhelp Community Services

Monday, April 8 | 8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

In developing and operating independent living facilities, bricks and mortar are important, but long-term vision, compassionate management, and a healthy dose of technology are key. This presentation will describe the joint efforts of an architect and client to renovate 400 existing independent living units and a new 92-unit residential tower that support frail, elderly aging-in-place residents. Attendees will explore green technologies as well as how to develop and promote wellness programs and provide the right spaces to support resident needs. You’ll discover simple technological solutions to support aging in place in existing facilities and learn how a skilled and dedicated team can support efforts to assist residents to remain happy, safe, and healthy at home.

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Track: Successful Remodeling and Repositioning
E04  Long-Term Living's Remodel Renovation Competition—A Review of 2012
Andrew Alden, MArch, Studio Director, Eppstein Uhen Architects

Monday, April 8 | 8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

The annual Remodel-Renovation Competition, sponsored by Vendome and SAGE, generates many projects competing for attention that have noteworthy aspects that can inspire renovation projects however big or small. This presentation will highlight winners as well as projects worthy of note. Attendees will meet the individuals involved in these various projects, explore renovation ideas for a variety of envrionments, and identify renovations with construction costs ranging from a few hundred dollars to the many thousands. Attendees will benchmark these best practices and also learn about the competition submission process and key elements to include in your own submission.

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Track: Future-focused Household Models
E05  Resident-Centered Care in China—An Amazing Cultural Journey
Jane Rohde, AIA, FIIDA, ACHA, AAHID, Principal, JSR Associates, Inc.
Jerry Smith, FASLA, EDAC, LEED AP, Owner/Principal, SMITH | GreenHealth Consulting, LLC

Monday, April 8 | 8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

China Senior Care, Inc., located in Hangzhou, China, is a unique company that focuses on elder care—unique because it is the first new community being built focusing on resident-centered care utilizing the Senior Living Sustainability Guide® as a process guide. This presentation will walk you through a resident-focused process from beginning to end and share how best practices in China and the United States were combined to create a blend of research and education to support successful outcomes for Chinese elders. It is an exemplary design model that integrates the care model with the building’s unique and supportive interior and exterior.

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Track: Improving Care for Those with Dementia
E06 Creative Brainwaves—Rethinking Dementia and Rethinking Design
Julie Bessant Pelech, BES, C. Gerontology, MA, Consulting Gerontologist, Bessant Pelech Associates, Inc.
Sandra B. Harris, S. Harris Interiors

Monday, April 8 | 8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

This inspiring and interactive session will demystify the brain affected by dementia. It will unravel the complexities of dementia in its various forms and explore the responsive behaviors that are most challenging to manage in congregate living environments. Equipped with this knowledge, designers will be able to unleash their creativity to support and even facilitate behaviors that have more positive and less disruptive manifestations. This is an opportunity to explore the world of dementia beyond Alzheimer’s disease and make the connections between environmental design and responsive behaviors. Be prepared to walk away with new ideas and a renewed passion for design.

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Monday, April 8 | 9:15 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

Track: Advancements Across the Continuum of Care
E07 The Cost of Fall Injuries—The Impact on LTC Organizations
Debra Harris, PhD, AAHID, RID, CEO, RAD Consultants
Laura Bauer, RID, LEED AP BD+C, Director of Innovation, RAD Consultants

Monday, April 8 | 9:15 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

When considering environmental factors in long-term care facilities, an intervention centered on flooring material designed to mitigate the severity of injury and morbidity of falls is a critical piece of the multiple risk factors puzzle. It may provide a preventive strategy with positive outcomes for the residents and cost avoidance for the long-term care organization. This presentation will present a research study that investigated the cost implications for a long-term care organization related to fall-related injuries. This research examines the cost burden on the long-term care organization related to fall-related injuries and death and outlines safe design strategies to reduce falls.

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Track: Emerging Trends Leading Change
E08  Affordable Senior Housing—Growing Trends
Brad Boal, Senior Associate, Noelker and Hull Associates, Inc.
Rodney Fenstermacher, Corporate Director of Construction, Noelker and Hull Associates, Inc.
Jeff Sturla, Vice President of Preconstruction, Benchmark Construction Company, Inc.

Monday, April 8 | 9:15 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

As the economy slowly recovers from the recession, senior living communities are searching for new and affordable ways to develop housing options and remain competitive in the marketplace. This session will explore senior living communities’ growing interest in affordable housing offerings and its potential as a viable housing option for senior living providers. Attendees will explore how to evaluate a community’s master plan, need identification, and the impact of affordable housing on campus and will weigh the advantages and disadvantages of affordable housing integration. They will hear about the processes involved in seeking funding for affordable housing projects and explore its potential as a continued viable housing option for senior living providers.

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Track: Innovations in Technology and Design
E09  Emerging Technology—Integration with Design for Improved Quality, Safety, and Care
Debbie Gregory, RN, BSN, Senior Clinical Consultant, Smith, Seckman, Reid, Inc.
Thompson Brown, RCCD, Senior Communciations Consultant, Smith, Seckman, Reid, Inc.

Monday, April 8 | 9:15 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

This presentation will discuss intentional alignment of design and technology to improve quality, safety, and efficiency of healthcare and elder care. Healthcare technology is changing at a rapid pace and providers and seniors are embracing emerging healthcare technology. But is technology ahead of practice transformation? Outcome driven standards of care must be the foundation for the integration of emerging technology to ensure financial investments parallel improved outcomes. Presenters will illustrate how strategic technology planning and governance throughout the continuum of care will ensure that technology investments and infrastructure requirements are adequate.

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Track: Successful Remodeling and Repositioning
E10  A Building “Usability” Evaluation Toolkit—For Aging Environments
Tahseen Hussain, EDAC, Master of Science in Architecture Student at Texas A&M University, BArch, New Jersey Institute of Technology

Monday, April 8 | 9:15 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

The term “usability” is widely used in fields such as product design, information technology, and web design. Building usability is about the entire occupant experience, but occupants that “use” architecture barely realize its usability unless the discomforts of the environment overwhelm the experience. Building usability is critical in designing for the elderly. This session will offer a Building Usability Toolkit and provide tools that integrate literature-based design theory and practice to assess the usability of aging environments. The presenter will outline positive and negative design usability applications and share how to successfully interpret, analyze, and incorporate theoretical concepts and ideas addressed in the literature to specific design requirements of a project.

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Track: Future-focused Household Models
E11  A Community-based Greenhouse Approach—Development Goals, Opportunities, and Outcomes
Susan Frazier, BSN, MA, Chief Operating Officer, The Green House Project
Robert Simonetti, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Project Architect, SWBR Architects

Monday, April 8 | 9:15 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

This seminar will explore the unique development opportunities available to providers and developers collaborating to provide healthcare via a decentralized community based approach. Presenters will explore the objectives of (re)integrating elders into their hometown communities in lieu of a centralized healthcare campus. Participants will consider opportunities to leverage the strength and skills of local developers in this effort. Using the nations’ first Community-based Greenhouse project as a case study, attendees will examine common goals of the provider and developer and will learn the potential marketing, cost, and approval benefits associated with pairing a healthcare occupancy with a small scale residential development.

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Track: Improving Care for Those with Dementia
E12  Designing for Daily Life with Dementia
Lena Smith, PhD, COO/Clinical Director, Retreat Healthcare

Monday, April 8 | 9:15 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

This presentation will discuss the changes in the brain and body when a progressive dementia is present, review the nine domains of function in the brain, and address how dementia changes the interaction between the person and the environment. Dr. Smith will identify environmental priorities for people in the advanced stages of the disease using photographs, case studies, and current empirical research and will differentiate between early dementia and advanced dementia, while discussing the environmental changes that must be addressed in each stage of the disease. Attendees will learn how a well-designed environment can interact with and enhance a well-designed care program.

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Monday, April 8 | 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Track: Advancements Across the Continuum of Care
E13  Hospice—The Missing link in the Continuum of Care
Robert A. (Skip) Yauger, AIA, LEED AP, NCARB, Principal, Gresham Smith and Partners
Susan Ponder-Stansel, President and CEO, Gresham Smith and Partners
Penny Houchens, IIDA, LEED AP, Senior Interior Design, Gresham Smith and Partners

Monday, April 8 | 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

The hospice business model is highly regulated and hospices that chose to provide inpatient care often build freestanding facilities where patients and families have to contend with unfamiliar location and environment. One organization is changing that. The Community Hospice of Northeast Florida successfully developed the Bailey Center for Caring at Flagler Hospital in St. Augustine, Florida. Built as an identifiable addition to a hospital, patients and families are provided a seamless continuum of care, in an innovative environment designed to enhance the human end-of-life experience in way not seen only a few years ago. Hear this compelling vision for how the hospice of the future can become a reality today.

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Track: Emerging Trends Leading Change
E14  Aging—Demands on the Workplace
Roberta Null, PhD, author, President, Common Place Design
Joy Potthoff, Ed.D, Interior Design Professor, Bowling Green State University
Ruby Trow, Professor Emeritus, Foods and Nutritional Sciences and teacher/educator in vocational and technical education at Cal Poly Pomona

Monday, April 8 | 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Health professionals have cautioned for some time that design innovations will be necessary to support age-related changes such as diminished hearing, eyesight, and stress tolerance, an increased risk of injury, musculoskeletal disorders, and obesity. Work has changed. Technology has given us the freedom to work any time, any place, providing new opportunities in office and home office design. This presentation will identify design changes needed to improve work environments for older people and outline health, safety, and wellness issues in the workplace. It will interpret age-related research on the workplace and identify how to incorporate technology in the design of the flexible work environment.

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Track: Innovations in Technology and Design
E15 Senior Living Environments—Evidence-based Indoor Lighting Design Strategies
Michael David White, EDAC, LC, LEED AP, Senior Lighting Designer, Schuler Shook
Sonia Ancoli-Israel, PhD, Professor of Psychiatry, Director, Gillin Sleep and Chronomedicine Research Center, Deputy Director, Stein Institute for Research
Richard Wilson, MD, Health Research, LLC.

Monday, April 8 | 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Evidence-based indoor lighting design strategies are needed for senior living environments where residents have limited access to outdoor activities that provide exposure to bright, natural light. Chronic sleep disorders in elderly residents (stemming from altered circadian rhythms due to lack of natural light) have been identified as both a clinical challenge and as an opportunity for beneficial, non-pharmacological intervention through evidence-based interior lighting design. In this session, attendees will discover the relevance of light to human health and identify biological issues in lighting for senior environments. You will acquire perspective on the current circadian light knowledge set and explore the application of innovative lighting design principles.

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Track: Successful Remodeling and Repositioning
E16  Breathing New Life into Legacy Buildings
Heidi Dahle, AIA, EDAC, LEED AP, MArch, MS Health Design, Project Architect, Worn Jerabek Architects, PC
Todd Wiltse, AIA, LEED AP, NCARB, Chicago Registered Energy Professional, Associate Partner, Worn Jerabek Architects, PC

Monday, April 8 | 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

A large percentage of skilled care providers are saddled with “legacy buildings” that do not meet contemporary standards for resident-centered care. However, it is possible implement large-scale interventions in legacy buildings that correct outmoded care delivery environments while preserving attachments to existing facilities and working within financial and cultural constraints. Through case studies, this session will provide an in-depth look at a variety of strategies that address the renovation challenges (structural, cultural, and financial) and offer specific interventions targeted at improving independence and wellness, advancing future-focused models of care, and addressing the needs of all stakeholders.

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Track: Future-focused Household Models
E17  Culture Change? Yes You Can!
Kristopher Tiernan, AIA, LEED AP, Project Manager/Associate, JSA, Inc.
Michael P. Gerhardt, Senior Vice President, College Street Partners
Sharon Fisher, Vice President, Business Development, Genesis Healthcare

Monday, April 8 | 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

America’s largest nursing home provider has developed a new hybrid-household nursing home that embodies the goals of culture change while meeting the financial models of a for-profit company. Genesis Healthcare will lease and operate a new community responding to a changing market with a range of services to attract residents with a variety of needs. It has responded to the increasing challenges of tighter budgets and the dynamics of healthcare reform while maintaining a high level of resident care. The development team will share their journey from project vision, financial models, leasing strategies, design goals, regulatory challenges, tight construction budgets, construction, move-in and a four-month post-occupancy evaluation. 

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Track: Improving Care for Those with Dementia
E18  The Development of a Successful Memory Care Community in China
Joyce Polhamus, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Vice President, SmithGroupJJR
Jim Biggs, Managing Director, SmithGroup JJR

Monday, April 8 | 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

In the past few years, China has become Senior Living’s land of opportunity. The need for care is immense and American developers and operators are moving to China with the hope of creating successful communities based on American models. In March 2013, Honghui Senior Living is opening a state-of-the-art, 33-unit Memory Care Community. This presentation will feature lessons learned from its initial inception, to program development, design, construction, and finally resident move in and will share critical lessons learned, including gaining government approvals, finding and training qualified staff, in-depth market analyses, and sales and marketing strategies. Learn how this American model was completely tailored to Chinese cultural requirements and desires. 

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Monday, April 8 | 2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Track: Advancements Across the Continuum of Care
E19  Balancing Culture Change with Increasing SNF Resident Acuity
James Lin, DO, MS (MedEd), Geriatric Medicine Specialist, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine Institute for Successful Aging at Millcreek Manor
Michael McKay, AIA, ACHE, LEED AP, Senior Architect, ERDMAN

Monday, April 8 | 2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Pressure on inpatient reimbursements, discharge rates, and inpatient length of stay has translated into higher acuity levels for residents needing skilled nursing care. Providers struggle with limited resources to sustain current levels of care and meet the needs of high acuity residents requiring advanced specialized levels of care. Millcreek Community Health System addressed this challenge by using its integrated medical school and hospital to provide an exquisite level of care not seen by the marketplace. It envisions a bold, future model for skilled nursing facilities supported through programming, design, and operations. Attendees will hear the story of project delivery through an adverse and complicated approval process under extraordinary time constraints on a challenging site.  

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Track: Emerging Trends Leading Change
E20  Lesbian, Gay, Bi, Transgender (LGBT) Senior Housing Project: Linking Identity to Aging in Place
Elva Rubio, LEED AP, Accredited Professional, U.S, Green Building Council, Regional Design Director, Gensler
Michael Hanley, AIA, LEED AP, Associate, Gensler
Rod Vickroy, Associate IIDA, RID, LEED AP, Health and Wellness Practice Area Leader, Gensler

Monday, April 8 | 2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

By 2030 it is estimated that there will be over 3 million LGBT seniors living in the U.S. Successful aging requires financial security, access to quality healthcare, and social support from both family and the community. But what happens when these essentials are not universally available? As a demographic that has lived life on the “fringe,” there are multiple barriers in accessing services and support for the LGBT community. This session will present a case study of a senior housing project for Chicago’s LGBT community and examine how the built environment can be leveraged as a tool that uniquely supports the LGBT community with dignity and through the diversity of living options. 

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Track: Innovations in Technology and Design
E21  Activity Rooms to Engagement Spaces—Creating Environments and Adapting Technology for Persons with Dementia
Juliet Holt Klinger, BSW, MA, Director of Dementia Care and Programs, Brookdale Senior Living
Laura Busalacchi, IIDA, Director of Interior Services, Brookdale Senior Living
Jack York, BS, CEO and Co-Founder, It's Never 2 Late

Monday, April 8 | 2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

This session examines the evolution of activity space from the traditional, institutional, segregated rooms to engagement areas throughout the assisted living environment. Focusing specifically on how the environment and new technologies can be used to engage persons living with dementia, presenters will share photos and and live demonstrations of effective adaptive technologies. A review of newly designed spaces in dementia-specific assisted living settings will illustrate the importance of a balance of relational space and opportunities for solo engagement. Presenters will review the creation of meaningful life skills areas and how the environment can support purpose and meaning in a person-centered context.

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Track: Successful Remodeling and Repositioning
E22  Repositioning, Rebranding, and Rebalancing—Engaging Residents
Jocelyn Martin, Director of Business Development, Creative Construction Solutions
Matt Bekelja, Client Services Manager, Creative Construction Solutions
Kimberly Nobbs Evans, Principal, Prajna Partners LLC

Monday, April 8 | 2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Staying relevant is critical to the success of any senior living community. Many senior living organizations struggle with the necessary, but difficult, decision to reposition to attract and accommodate a changing market. Whether facing the need for changes to overall design and/or shifting the mix of the care components, the decision to reposition impacts resident satisfaction. This presentation will share how to protect (even enhance) the relationship with residents through meaningful engagement. Learn how effective cost estimating strategies support innovative ways of creating inspiring environments while rebalancing the resident mix. Hear about a case study of one CCRC that successfully aligned repositioning and rebranding efforts to attract the next generation of retirees.

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Track: Future-focused Household Models
E23  The VA Goes Home—Small and Green
Christa Hojlo, PhD, RN, NHA, Director, VA Community Living Centers, Department of Veterans Affairs
Mollie R. West, MHA, FACHE, Health System Specialist, Facilities Planning Service, Department of Veterans Affairs, Office of Construction and Facilities Management
Robert Simonetti, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Project Architect, SWBR Architects
J. David Hoglund, FAIA, President, Perkins Eastman

Monday, April 8 | 2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

The Veterans Administration is undergoing a comprehensive shift in their model of veteran care. Using VA project case studies, and engaging story telling by senior VA staff, this program will explore various culture change models and how they can be uniquely crafted to suite an individual campus and culture. By exploring the programming process, presenters will identify strategies for finding unique solutions and environmental features suited to the unique needs of your organization and its care model and will identify methods of engagment and education for staff—the key to any successful change project. 

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Track: Improving Care for Those with Dementia
E24  Creating Better Alzheimer’s Environments—Exploring Environmental Design and Things Most Overlooked
Elizabeth (Betsy) Brawley, AAHID, IIDA, CID, Healthcare Interior Designer, President, Design Concepts Unlimited
Jane Rohde, AIA, FIIDA, ACHA, AAHID, Principal, JSF Associates, Inc.  

Monday, April 8 | 2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Dementia is a serious and growing problem. Environmental approaches are often under appreciated, even though they often have a faster, safer, and more effective impact than other interventions and offer some of the best strategies to maximize quality of life. This program will explore the most common items often overlooked in planning and designing environments for residents with Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia. Creating better support environments relies on exploring practical, innovative ideas based on the results of current outcome-based research studies, flexible design, and the clear intention to accommodate change over time—allowing flexibility for evolving ideas and programs!

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Monday, April 8 | 3:45 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

Track: Advancements Across the Continuum of Care
E25  Occupational Therapy—It’s Not Just Rehab Anymore
Kerrie Ramsdell, MS, LOTR, Occupational Therapist, Assistant Professor of Clinical Occupational Therapy, LSUHSC

Monday, April 8 | 3:45 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

Occupational therapists (OTs) are often misunderstood as only working in rehab with patients or clients on activities of daily living skills, or ADLS. However, their training on health and disability-related issues through an individualized lens can help designers, administrators, and policy-makers promote optimal environments for aging. OTs are trained to focus on a person–environment–occupational performance framework that can be applied to a greater scale for health care design. In this session, attendees will identify at least four person factors that impact functioning and participation and understand the OT’s role in promoting health through participation. You will hear three case studies that demonstrate the OTs’ contribution to environmental adaptation and role in assistive technology (AT).  

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Track: Emerging Trends Leading Change
E26  Pocket Change—Pocket Neighborhoods and New Urbanism That Reinvented an Aging Garden Community
Eric McRoberts, AIA, AIA Design for Aging Knowledge Community, Partner, RLPS Architects
Vassar Byrd, CEO, Rose Villa Senior Living Community
Craig Witz, Principal, Witz Company

Monday, April 8 | 3:45 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

Today’s CCRC consumer expects housing that incorporates amenities such as great rooms, eat-in kitchens, laundry centers, and an office or den, yet provides connection to the larger community. This session, through the case study example of the Rose Villa Garden Community, will demonstrate how well-conceived housing incorporates traditional neighborhood design concepts to foster a sense of connection in a comfortable, senior-friendly community setting. The master plan also envisions a commercial center and Main Street, with resident amenities at street level and loft apartment living above. The presenters will draw upon their varied perspectives to discuss pocket neighborhood and new urbanism concepts.

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Track: Innovations in Technology and Design
E27  Imagining a Net-Zero Energy CCRC
Joe Zody, AIA, NCARB, Senior Living Leader, DLR Group
Donald Horkey, PE, LEED AP, Principal Mechanical Engineer, DLR Group

Monday, April 8 | 3:45 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

The presentation will illustrate how careful integration of design disciplines can have a positive impact on driving a facility toward reducing its energy use. Presenters will provide examples of concepts and case studies that will enhance energy reduction for both new construction and retrofitted existing structures, as well as concepts and ideas to produce off-setting energy on the site. Attendees will learn about net-zero energy as it relates to continuing care retirement communities and examine how implementation of net-zero energy strategies will affect the bottom line. Additionally, you will identify strategies to reduce energy consumption in new and existing buildings and to capture, re-use, and produce energy on site.

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Track: Successful Remodeling and Repositioning
E28  The Atlanta Housing Authority—Transforming Public Housing into Aging-Well Communities
Cynthia McDonald, Special Services Director, Draper & Associates
Marvin Nesbitt, Director, Human Development Services, Atlanta Housing Authority
Jim Hudgins, Jr., AIA, CASP, LEED AP, Executive Vice President and COO, THW Design

Monday, April 8 | 3:45 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

The Atlanta Housing Authority (AHA) is one of the largest housing agencies in the country and a national leader in the transformation of public housing. This presentation will provide a case study on how the AHA has redefined senior living in public housing by transforming 11 high-rise residential communities into active living communities through creative financing, health and wellness programs, updated technology, and architectural design. Attendees will learn how AHA made use of government-provided ARRA funds, agency generated funds and various grants to embark on an Active Living and Wellness program for its residents. In addition, attendees will learn how AHA addressed the physical and environmental needs of its seniors and how they are responding two years later, and see the before and after designs of AHA’s 11 communities.

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Track: Future-focused Household Models
E29  A Review of the Winners from the 2013 Environments for Aging Competition
Russell McLaughlin, AIA, Senior Associate, AG Architecture
Amy Carpenter, AIA LEED BD+C, Architect, AG Architecture

Monday, April 8 | 3:45 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

The annual Environments for Aging Design Competition has had a presence at the EFA Conference since the first conference many years ago. This session will provide a forum for the competition winners to speak about the their projects and share solutions and challenges they encountered during the design and construction process. Attendees will meet the individuals involved in these various projects and have the opportunity to ask questions about the winning entries. In addition attendees will learn about the competition submission process and key elements to include in their submissions.

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Track: Improving Care for Those with Dementia
E30  “Care-oasis”—Switzerland’s Evidence-based Contribution for a Dementia Care Unit  
Christian Feldkircher, blumergaignat ag
Michael Schmieder, founder, “Care-oasis,” Director of Sonnweid, Switzerland’s leading dementia care facility

Monday, April 8 | 3:45 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

“Care-oasis” is a small unit care concept for people with severe dementia. Join the founder of the concept and head of Switzerland’s leading dementia care campus who will describe key conceptual goals, its history, its implementation, and research findings. A broad discussion about this model has been held in Europe since its implementation, with positive outcomes leading to profound evaluations and pilot studies in Germany. This session will inform their main results and provide case studies of the model’s conceptual evolution compared to research findings. A new trendsetting project of a nursing home will also be presented founded on the evolution of this concept, backed by evidence.

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Tuesday, April 9 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Track: Advancements Across the Continuum of Care
E31  The Future of the Hospice Residence
Vicki Nelson, AIA, ACHA, LEED AP, Vice President, Diekema Hamann

Tuesday, April 9 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

This session will focus on three aspects of hospice residence design: (1) the unique building type and its fundamental elements; (2) how care provider’s experiences are affected by the move from home care settings to a hospice residence; and (3) the future of hospice residence design. Using case studies from over 14 years of hospice residence design and interviews from care providers across the U.S., attendees will explore the fundamental elements of hospice design and factors that create design variation including care provider interpretations of care delivery; ethnic, religious, and cultural identities of hospice patients; and identities of the communities in which they live. The sessions will conclude with a forecast for how long-term care and healthcare trends will influence future hospice design.

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Track: Emerging Trends Leading Change
E32  Synaptic Networks—How Sesame Street Could Change Aging in Place
Zachary Benedict, AIA, LEED AP, Partner, Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.

Tuesday, April 9 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. 

With the rapid growth of the creative class and aging baby boomers, communities will soon face one of the largest m0.igratory shifts in American history. As people move, they continue to reaffirm their desire for places that provide social interaction and walkability. Through an idea called “synaptic networks,” this presentation uses examples ranging from Big Bird to Bruce Willis to illustrate the power of interpersonal connections and the value of engagement. This discussion will explore how the patterns we use every day to interact with one another can be leveraged to dramatically impact the vibrancy of the communities in which we work and live—embracing the idea that if we raise the quality of life for older adults we inherently raise it for everyone! 

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Track: Innovations in Technology and Design
E33  Sense-Sensitive Design and the Aging Process
Richard Mazuch, BSc (Arch), Registered ARB and RIBA, Director of Design Research and Innovation, Nightingale IBI

Tuesday, April 9 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Future healthcare for the elderly will range from assisted living, self-care, telecare and telemedicine within a single housing unit, to multiple units supported by multiple providers, services, and professionals. This presentation will define the challenges of the ever-changing needs of an aging population through clear understanding of the aging process—maturation of the senses, body systems, physiology, and related medical issues—and how this understanding can influence the design process. Key ergonomic and anthropometric data will be shared that point to design choices including fabric and finishes, furniture and fittings, equipment and devices, and lastly, key technologies designed to accommodate the aging body.

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Track: Successful Remodeling and Repositioning
E34  Repositioning, Repurposing, Remodeling—What’s the Difference Anyway?
Robert Pfauth, AIA, NCARB, Principal, LifePLACE Designs

Tuesday, April 9 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Multiple terms are being used nowadays to describe strategies for making facility more appealing, competitive, and profitable. Should you reposition? Repurpose? Remodel? This session will explore the distinctions between these and other approaches, as well as their implications in terms of the likely cost, complexity, and duration of each. Through a review of analytical, strategic, and development principles, illustrated with case studies and enlivened by group discussion, the presenter will bring clarity to the maze of potential project approaches. While there is no one-size-fits-all solution for the host of issues confronting providers today, there are ways to carve out a path that’s right for your community through the jungle of possibilities.

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Track: Future-focused Household Models
E35  Household, Home-like, or Home—Creating a Truly Livable Place for Elders
Amy Carpenter, AIA, LEED BD+C, Principal, Lenhardt Rodgers Architecture + Interiors
Addie Abushousheh, PhD, EDAC, Executive Director, Association for Households International (AHHI)

Tuesday, April 9 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

As we move further away from the institutional-style nursing settings of the past, everyone seems to be trying to re-create the experience of home. But what really defines “home”? What resembles home varies from person to person, and local and cultural factors play a role. But are there some universal concepts of home common to all of us? This session will explore the meaning of home, look at how to create the comfortable feeling of belonging that comes with home, and how that can be realistically translated into a long-term care setting. We will also look at some projects where specific cultural influences were incorporated into the design.

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Track: Codes, Standards, and Other Considerations
E36  New Directions—2014 Guidelines for Residential Care Facilities!
Jane Rohde, AIA, FIIDA, ACHA, AAHID, Principal, JSR Associates, Inc.

Tuesday, April 9 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

For the 2014 cycle of the Facility Guidelines Institute's Guidelines for Design and Construction of Health Care Facilities, a brand new volume is being developed for residential and senior living facilities. The Guidelines cover different typologies for the different care types and models and an understanding of them is essential for development of future senior environments. This session will help attendees understand the direction of new codes and guidelines for residential care and how to use and access the FGI’s new Guidelines. You will also learn how to become involved in the development of the Guidelines that ultimately become code and most importantly, explore how codes and regulations can support culture change and resident-centered care.

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Tuesday, April 9 | 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Track: Advancements Across the Continuum of Care
E37  The Coler-Goldwater Project—Innovative Design and Delivery Strategies for SNFs and LTACHs
Jeffrey P. Drucker, AIA, Vice President, Northeast Region, Array Healthcare Facilities Solutions
Kent Doss, AIA, LEED AP, CEO and President, Array Healthcare Facilities Solutions

Tuesday, April 9 | 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Many hospital systems are dealing with budget shortfalls while simultaneously facing increasing patient demand. This is the case of The Health and Hospital Corporation, the nation's largest municipal healthcare organization, serving over 1.3 million New Yorkers annually with more than one-third of their patients uninsured. So how do you reconcile budget constraints, meet an aggressive schedule, exceed a city’s MBE/WBE goals, and design two state-of-the-art hospitals? Through innovative design, cost-effective material selection, efficient project delivery, time-saving technology, and team building incentive programs developed to encourage collaboration and creativity. This session will take you behind the scenes and share new design, project management, and delivery techniques that will shape how facilities will be designed and delivered in the future.

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Track: Emerging Trends Leading Change
E38  Off to See the Wizard—The Evidence-based Road to Financial Success
Lorissa MacAllister, AIA, LEED AP, NCARB, EDAC, President and Founder, Enviah
Kimberly Firth, PhD, Director of Research, Samueli Institute

Tuesday, April 9 | 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

This presentation will discuss the development of a Western Michigan–based community pilot program entitled “Environments in Aging,” founded by various professionals concerned about the lack of resources and support for persons with chronic conditions and their caregivers. Utilizing a collaborative approach, evidenced-based principles, and a best-practice research model, the pilot program seeks to open the channels of communication within the community and takes an innovative approach to bring healthcare and service provider collaboration to the next level. Attendees will hear about how this program is at the leading edge of research in the latest evidence-based practices and translates that research into a quantifiable performance-based practice with predictable and financially feasible outcomes.

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Track: Innovations in Technology and Design
E39  Considering Vision—How to Create Effective, Intuitive Spaces for Persons with Low Vision
Amy Pothier, ARIDO, IDC, LEED Green Associate, Intern Interior Designer, Accessibility Specialist, Quadrangle Architects Limited

Tuesday, April 9 | 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

It is predicted that by the year 2025, 1 in every 5 people will be over the age of 60. Designers must reconsider designs to meet the needs of persons who have low or declining visual acuity. This seminar will delve into common types of vision loss and highlight how to accommodate that loss through building design and selection of interior finishes. Designing for an aging population in the workplace, as well as considering the needs of persons with limited vision in public buildings, will be highighted. Learn about appropriate, accessible signage, wayfinding methods, and color contrast tips that can be integrated into any building design.

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Track: Successful Remodeling and Repositioning
E40  Senior Co-op Housing—Development, Design, Remodeling, and Governance
Barbara Murphy, BS Housing Management and Marketing, University of Minnesota, Realtor, State of Minnesota, Marketing Consultant, 7500 York Cooperative
Nancy Soman, Marketing Consultant, Fresh Start Venture
Lyn A. Berglund, ASID, CID, Director of Interior Design, Mohagan/Hansen Architectural Group.

Tuesday, April 9 | 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Participants in this session will learn about the experience of 7500 York—a 33-year-old senior co-op—and gain insights from 90 other co-op projects ranging in size, locale, and economics. Hear how developers tap into the vast knowledge and experience of their senior residents to continually improve the designed environments and organizational structure to meet the needs of specific communities. Explore how to leverage the skills that served seniors when they were employed and how to showcase these skills for strong, successful senior communities. Discuss how to avoid the typical pitfalls and inspire participation that develop rich social connections among residents to retain independent lifestyles as seniors age.  

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Track: Future-focused Household Models
E41  Multigenerational Environments for Aging—An International Perspective
Tim Swanson, MArch, BA, Architect and Urbanist, Cannon Design
Zhe Wang, PhD, RA, EDAC, LEED AP BD+C, Senior Researcher and Architect, Cannon Design

Tuesday, April 9 | 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

A holistic approach to urban planning and neighborhood development requires integrated strategies toward health, services, education, and aging in place. This presentation will offer case studies of urban neighborhood developments in India and China. With an emphasis on multigenerational housing and supportive environments for older adults, findings from the comparison of the planning and design of these communities will be shared and discussed. Learn about advancements in amenities that are integral and critical to healthy urban planning, such as a comprehensive public transit system, accessible retail, walkable communities, cultural institutions, and shared open spaces that facilitating aging in place for the community at large.

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Track: Codes, Standards, and Other Considerations
E42  Regulatory Change and Culture Change—Continuing the Journey
Margaret Calkins, PhD, CAPS, EDAC, Board Chair, IDEAS Institute
Robert Mayer, PhD, President, IDEAS Institute

Tuesday, April 9 | 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Regulations used to be routinely cited as a barriers—either real or perceived—to culture change. However, things are changing. Since 2004, the Rothschild Foundation has worked to build bridges of understanding with the regulatory community in order to craft regulations more supportive of self-directed, relationship-based care. This session will review the six Rothschild Regulatory Task Force Initiatives, providing the most current information on changes to codes. This must-attend session will provide the most up-to-date information to both providers and designers on how various codes are being changed to not just allow but actively support person-centered care.

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