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Monday, March 21, 2011
 
9:45 - 10:45 a.m.

Track: Considerations for Effective Aging Environments
E01 — Reinvention on a Dime
Gregory Scott, AIA, Partner, RLPS Architects
Kathleen Goff, Associate, RLPS Architects

The ability to make lemonade from bitter lemons can mean the difference between success and failure. This session will explore renovating and redesigning unmarketable inventory within an existing building envelope into state-of-the-art products that often exceed consumer expectations.  Participants will receive an overview of the challenges many CCRC's face with old buildings in addition to limited financial and land resources, coupled with sluggish occupancy rates.   Opportunities to quickly, cost efficiently and successfully transform apartment units into marketable housing stock will be discussed. Creative design solutions, products and opportunities to provide warmer environments that support a resident-centered model of health care will be explored.

 
 
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9:45 - 10:45 a.m.
Track: Innovations in Design for Positive Outcomes
E02 — Culture Change and Person Centered Care in New Small Houses—Design Features that Improve the Odds
Tim Mueller, AIA, LEED AP, Senior Vice President and Director of Seniors Design, SFCS Inc.
Lorraine G. Hiatt, Ph.D., Environmental Gerontologist, Planning, Research and Design for Aging
 
Improve the odds of culture change and person-centered care by packing new design options into small houses—new or remodeled! Learn to incorporate realistic resident movements and capabilities—such as variations in memory, therapy or clinical needs—by designing for more intuitive staffing and multi-tasking. Apply data on "opportunistic"

social spaces and on choices that contribute to great dining and kitchen design. Gain creative insights from bedroom/bathroom improvements without compromising layout, natural lighting or adding walking distances and cost. You will walk away with convincing arguments to win over decision makers and successfully create and operate small houses.

 
 
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9:45 - 10:45 a.m.

 

Track: Solutions that Enhances the Human Experience
E03 — Evidence-based Design for Individuals with Dementia—What's New in the Last 5 Years?
Maggie Calkins, PhD, CAPS, EDAC, President, IDEAS

There is solid evidence of design practices that make a difference for residents with dementia and areas where myths still abound. Is there evidence that smaller is better or is there an ideal size? Does the provision of a kitchen improve meal-related outcomes? What elements support orientation? Are private rooms always best- or are there alternatives that are equally good? These questions and more will be reviewed through research and case studies. You will learn about design characteristics (such as light and color factors) that have been shown to improve outcomes and identify opportunities for future research your organization can contribute to in this arena.

 
 
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9:45 - 10:45 a.m.
Track: Future-focused Models Leading Change
E04 — It Takes a Village—Intergenerational Living at Bethany Village
Roy Kim, Developer, President, Central Bethany Development
Francesca Kim, Director of Designing/Owner, Laurel Parc at Bethany

Bethany Village provides residents with the very best in community living where residents live, work, play and shop in a master-planned, pedestrian-friendly community. This case study will illuminate how intergenerations can live together through a well planned community where independents and those with assisted living requirements are not isolated. See examples of how the design, planning and sustainability process, as well as diverstiy, can result in a community that not only sustains itself but keeps the local economy and environment thriving!

 
 
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9:45 - 10:45 a.m.

Track: Trends Towards Independence and Wellness
E05 — Independence, Wellness and Choice at Laguna Honda Hospital
Colleen Riley, CMO, Laguna Honda Hospital
Michael Lllewellyn, Chief Operating Officer, Laguna Honda Hospital

This state-of-the-art facility ushers in an imaginative era of patient-centered care. Dedicated to fostering community independence, wellness, and choice for a safety-net population, the hospital integrates individual needs and preferences with the efficiencies afforded by a single, integrated organization.  Participants will identify concepts in hospital design that promote healing, independence and wellness and explore the benefits of intergenerational activities, animal therapy, gardening, and art that contribute to a patient's reconnection to self and community. This beacon of patient-centered care will provide invaluable benchmarks that can be applied to any facility.

 
 
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9:45 - 10:45 a.m.

NEW!
Track: Aging in Place - Universal Design

A01 - Designing Homes that Make Life Easier—the Universal Design Living Laboratory
Rosemarie Rossetti, Ph.D., President, Rossetti Enterprises
 
This presentation is based on real life research and the Universal Design Living Laboratory, a new national demonstration home and garden in Columbus, Ohio. The presenter, Rosemarie Rossetti, Ph.D. will review what works, what sells, and where the challenges are. Participants will identify smart design solutions that provide independence for homebuyers with multiple needs and abilities, pinpoint design problems that negatively affect daily living and gain real life understanding of true universal design, accessible design, adaptable design, aging in place, and visitability. Essential components for kitchens, baths and entrances will be illustrated through real working examples as well as building techniques and products that are essential for any livable home.
 
 
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11:00 a.m. — 12:00 p.m.

Track: Considerations for Effective Aging Environments
E06 — Constructing a Road Map for Culture Change in Long Term Care—A National Stakeholder Perspective
Addie Johnson, EDAC, Org. & Env. Gerontologist, PhD Candidate, Fellow, Institute on Aging & Environment, School of Architecture and Urban Planning - UW-Milwaukee
Mark Proffitt, EDAC, Ph.D. Candidate & Fellow, Institute on Aging & Environment, School of Architecture and Urban Planning - UW-Milwaukee

This session offers a multi-disciplinary perspective of the culture change movement by reporting the results of a national survey of pioneering practitioners and stakeholders, as well as a recently convened think-tank panel who weighed-in on the key components of culture change, including the household model. Participants will explore considerations for changing the structure of the organization, altering operations, reconfiguring the environment and financial issues. Identify key obstacles which impede the implementation of culture change strategies, their solutions, and methods for assessing their efficacy. Anyone planning significant alterations to their organization or environment will benefit from this unique overarching perspective.

 
 
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11:00 a.m. — 12:00 p.m.

Track: Innovations in Design for Positive Outcomes
E07 — Benchmarking Senior Care Facilities with ENERGY STAR's New Energy Performance Scale
Clark Reed, Director of Healthcare Facilities Division for ENERGY STAR, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Erin Richmond, Senior Associate, ICF International

EPA estimates that senior care communities can reduce energy consumption by as much as 30%. Key to reducing consumption is an understanding of building energy performance. EPA's ENERGY STAR Manager is a free tool that allows you to track and assess energy consumption across your entire portfolio of buildings in a secure online environment. Whether you own, manage, or hold properties for investment, Portfolio Manager can help you set investment priorities, identify under-performing buildings, and verify efficiency improvements. In this session, attendees will gain a broad understanding of the value of energy benchmarking and learn how Portfolio Manager can be used to compare performance over time and against other buildings across the nation.

 
 
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11:00 a.m. — 12:00 p.m.
Track: Solutions that Enhance the Human Experience
E08 — Out of Sight—Senior Care Design for Age Related Visual Impairments
Chris Downey, Architect, Architecture for the Blind
Joyce Polhamus, AIA, LEED AP, Vice President, SmithGroup
Diana Kissil, AIA, Principal, SmithGroup
More than 6.5 million Americans over the age of 65 have vision impairments, a statistic slated to double by 2030. Today's senior care facilities must be prepared for this growing demographic. This presentation will explore the findings of a blind architect, Chris Downey. Working from his assessments of Braille drawings from two senior living projects and results of a walkability study, participants will discover the benefits of facility wayfinding for vision-impaired seniors, strategies and guidelines to better accommodate, and innovative multi-sensory design strategies, planning solutions, and construction details. Understand how tactility, touch, smell, temperature, sound, and technology can enhance and create a safer environment for visually impaired seniors.
 
 
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11:00 a.m. — 12:00 p.m.

Track: Future-focused Models Leading Change
E09 — New Urbanism—Not So New, But So Applicable to Senior Living
Jane Rohde, AIA, FIIDA, ACHA, AAHID, LEED AP, Principal, JSR Associates, Inc.
Elizabeth Brawley, AIA, FIIDA, ACHA, AAHID, LEED AP, President, Design Concepts Unlimited

With the development of the retail avenue concept and the integration of housing, retail and amenity services, new urbanism is not such a new concept. It is rare, however, to see a senior living community model imbedded within a new town center — at the center core. The discussion will provide insight into the creation of an intentional community and the necessary change of mindset required to imbed senior living and healthy aging within both existing and new communities. Case studies will outline the process for creating intentional communities and how to discuss them with clients, organizations and end users. These benchmarks will also demonstrate successful outcomes for all residents living in an intentional community.

 
 
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11:00 a.m. — 12:00 p.m.

Track: Trends Towards Independence and Wellness
E10 — Walking and Independence—Design and Planning for Seniors
Zhe Wang, Ph.D., RA, LEED AP, EDAC, Cannon Design

There is no debate that walking—a moderate physical activity—slows functional and psychological decline in later life by preventing chronic disease and promoting social interactivity and wellness. Effective design and planning of site-level and neighborhood environments have been found to influence older adult's walking and independence sequentially.  Resting on conclusive data from multiple research and case studies, this session explores the potential of residential sites and neighborhoods to promote walking and independence and discusses specific environmental features and concrete ways to optimize the walking environments in new and existing developments.

 
 
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11:00 a.m. — 12:00 p.m.

NEW!
Track: Aging in Place - Universal Design

A02 — Universal Design — Creating Homes and Communities for a Lifetime
Mary Jo Peterson, CKD, CBD, CAPS, CAASH
Betsy Sheppard, Gilbert & Sheppard Group, LLC  
 
Ever wonder what the future of 50+ housing will look like? Tomorrow's mature buyers want well-designed communities or alterations in their homes that allow them to be engaged and active. Although they may not acknowledge it today, they also want homes with thoughtful features that make it possible to comfortably age in place. A representative from AARP's Livable Communities program will provide builders, developers, designers and remodelers with a checklist of what makes a community truly livable. A leading expert will provide an overview of universal design, while a nationally recognized active adult builder and remodeler will show you how incorporate these features into new or existing construction—without breaking the budget.
 
 
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3:15-4:15 p.m.

Track: Considerations for Effective Aging Environments
E11 — The Mary Taylor House—A Case Study of Speedy, Green Design
Amy Carpenter, AIA, LEED, Principal, Wallace Roberts & Todd
John Schwab, AIA, LEED, President/CEO, The Hickman

This apartment building for elders of meager means was designed to allow residents to age in place and take advantage of the services and amenities in its urban setting. But to capitalize on stimulus funding, the zoning and site approvals, design, and documentation had to be completed in only four months! This presentation will share how this was made possible and will describe the process, discuss the challenges and advantages, and walk the audience through the finished product and notable features . Participants will discover the advantages to an integrated design process, see how to achieve a high level of sustainability in an affordable project, learn how urban parcels can deliver maximum benefits, and witness how a project can be planned for aging in place.

 
 
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3:15-4:15 p.m.

Track: Innovations in Design for Positive Outcomes
E12 — Criteria for Floorcovering in Senior Living Environments—An Evidenced-Based Design Approach
Jenny Kemper, Principal, Interiors for Senior Living
Betty Kemper, Principal, Interiors for Senior Living
Ridley Kinsey, Vice President, Healthcare, Tandus

Discover how you can enhance the built environment for residents/patients and the bottom line for owners with the appropriate floorcovering. We'll take an Evidence-Based Design approach to identify key issues to be considered, as well as the criteria to evaluate and select appropriate floorcoverings for senior living facilities. Participants will learn the aesthetic, kinesthetic and psychological impacts of flooring on residents/patients and will explore how comfort, safety and infection control can be impacted by floorcoverings, with special attention to reducing slip/fall injuries. Attendees will be pleasantly surprised to learn the financial, practical, and environmental benefits and returns of soft surface flooring in the senior living environment.

 
 
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3:15-4:15 p.m.

Track: Solutions that Enhances the Human Experience
E13 — The Design of Inpatient Hospice Environments to Support the Body, Mind, and Spirit
Andrew Alden, M.Arch, Senior Associate, Engberg Anderson, Inc.

Hospice, by its very definition, is resident centered and its holistic nature encourages both the resident and family members to be an active participant in the final moments of life. This interactive session will enable participants to identify the complex mix of physical environment features and human factors that contribute to defining the experience of an well designed inpatient hospice 'place'. Learn the trends occuring in the design of inpatient hospice environments and understand the logic behind various design elements including site, building configuration, common spaces, service spaces, and resident rooms. Finally, explore first hand the resident, staff and family perspective through a series of moving video and audio clips that reinforce the model.

 
 
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3:15-4:15 p.m.

Track: Future-focused Models Leading Change
E14 — Hybrid Homes for Seniors—The Best of Both Worlds
Gregory Scott, AIA, Partner, RLPS Architects
Linford Good, MPA, Vice President of Planning & Marketing, Landis Homes Retirement Community

Hybrid homes — combining apartment and cottage design models — can be the "best of both worlds" and a new choice in senior living that provides an intentional community that can be tailored to special interests, educational development or economic need. This session will look beyond conventional design solutions by exploring real world examples of the different shapes, sizes and price points a hybrid home can take.  Presenters will share design approaches to address site challenges and programming goals, review key program and design concepts for blending the two models while mitigating a variety of challenges. Strategies that address sustainable design, day lighting, outdoor connections, resident independence, privacy, and aging in place will be discussed.

 
 
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3:15-4:15 p.m.
Track: Trends Towards Independence and Wellness
E15 — The PACE Program—A Case Study in Successful Design
Laurie Placinski, IIDA, LEED AP, Interior Designer, Progressive AE
Reed VanderSlik, MDA, CMA, Vice President of Finance, Porter Hills
 
Combining senior services into one location creates greater efficiencies for the elderly population and the organizatoins that serve them. This presentation will discuss the benefits of the PACE (Programs of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly) program through the case study of Tanglewood Park, opened one year ago and the first of its kind in the nation. Hear how one organization modified the tenets of the national PACE program to meet its needs , integrated a variety of services and staff into one location and sought cost effective, creative solutions, including reuse of an appropriate existing facility. You will learn about statistics on its success and how it has been modified.
 
 
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3:15-4:15 p.m.

NEW!
Track: Aging in Place - Universal Design

A03 - Design for Life: The Ageless Home
Kerrie L Kelly, IIDA, ASID, IDEC, CID, Creative Director, Kerrie Kelly Design Lab and Director of Interior Design, Art Institute of California
 
For anyone planning on designing homes for the aging population, this session is a must. Participants will gain an in-depth understanding for how to create effective spaces for the elderly. Interior designers, architects, and homebuilders are increasingly asked by clients to design homes to allow for adaptation over time. This session focuses on planning for the ageless home. Case study examples of excellent design solutions for aging in place will also be a key focus of this session with plenty of room for participant interaction.
 
 
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4:30-5:30 p.m.

Track: Considerations for Effective Aging Environments
E16 — Are Your Buildings Contributing to Poor Resident Health?—How To Develop a Successful IEQ Plan
Donald Green, NCARB, AIA, LEED AP, Associate and Managing Architect, THW Design

Indoor environmental quality is crucial to the overall well being of senior residents. This presentation will outline critical issues within senior living communities that require attention including evaluation of the existing building envelope, building systems, cleaning & purchasing programs, as well as the overall indoor environment. Potential health risks from pollutants and toxins from building materials and everyday products will be identified along with the cause and effects to the senior resident. Participants will receive an outline for a comprehensive Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) plan and the steps necessary in the careful specification of building materials, construction processes and operational programs.

 
 
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4:30-5:30 p.m.
Track: Innovations in Design for Positive Outcomes
E17 — Are We Keeping Up? —Bridging the Gap Between Research and Design for Environments for the Aging
Matthew Kennedy, AIA, ACHA, Healthcare Practice Leader, Progressive AE

The healthcare industry has seen a steady growth in the use of evidence based design, but has it kept pace with the demands required by environments for aging? This session will walk participants through key research studies and current project examples where EBD has been utilized, identifying what's real, what's not and what's the truth behind this exciting new approach for environments for the aging. You'll learn how to avoid costly mistakes when using research evidence in ROI analyses, understand how to retool traditional design approaches to incorporate the latest research and understand how others are using research to gain a competitive edge in the market and sustain continued growth.

 
 
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4:30-5:30 p.m.

Track: Solutions that Enhances the Human Experience
E18 — Wellness Design—Architecture that Breaks the Bounds of Shelter
David Minnigan, AIA, IIDA, LEED-AP, Principal, Earl Swensson Associates, Inc.
Jay Keopf, AIA, IIDA, LEED-AP, Senior Director of Development, Brookdale Senior Living, Inc.

Senior living facilities are not only about housing, but about creating state-of-the-art environments that seek to stimulate and improve the quality of life and allow residents to retain their independence. True wellness design, combined with a wellness-based operational model, can improve the quality of life in many ways: nutritionally, physically, socially and spiritually. This session will highlight factors that should be considered in the design process, as well as the design process itself, to create true wellness environments. Participants will learn the differences between wellness design and shelter design and the areas of a person's life on which buildings have a profound effect.

 
 
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4:30-5:30 p.m.

Track: Future-focused Models Leading Change
E19 — The Future—Quality Affordable Housing for Seniors
Ron Lloyd, Registered Architect, President, RDL Architects, Inc.
David Uram, Registered Architect, Principal, PIRHL
Martha Kutik, President and CEO, Jennings Center for Older Adults

Affordable senior housing is a critical concern now and into the future. Lead by two professionals with rich experience in senior living services and the affordable housing market, this collaborative session will deliver an in-depth overview of funding options including Low Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC). They will reveal keys to a successful LIHTC application (including site selection and acquisition) and the significance of having an experienced team. Discuss skills required for design and construction of quality affordable housing and strategies for obtaining gap funding and information about various agencies involved in this type of financing. Finally, understand how a team can leverage best practices for smart growth and sustainable building practices.

 
 
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4:30-5:30 p.m.

Track: Trends Towards Independence and Wellness
E20 — Increasing Physical Activity through Access to Nature
Susan Rodiek, Ph.D., NCARB, Endowed Professor, Center for Health Systems & Design

Physical activity is known to be a major component of healthy aging. This session will highlight the results of a large multiregional study that examined the connection between physical activity and the availability of usable outdoor spaces in long-term care settings. By controlling for factors such as age, gender, health status, ADLs, and use of assistive devices, researchers were able to identify specific ways in which the built environment may encourage or discourage physical activity by residents. Attendees will learn which environmental features may impact physical activity, and how to evaluate a wide range of existing outdoor environments for older adults.

 
 
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4:30-5:30 p.m.

NEW!
Track: Aging in Place - Universal Design

A04 - Design for CHOICE!
Carol Reitter Elia, ASID, LEED-AP, CR DESIGN
Melinda Sechrist, FASID, Sechrist Design Associates, Inc.
 
The Silent Generation is upon us with the Boomers right behind them—and they are telling us they expect choices! This session will review how our aging population is driving change in every aspect of housing for over 55 communities and how that will affect everyone from the owners, developers, managers, architects, designers and residents. Explore how this demand for choice impacts the design process, and how it is leading to new models and changes to both existing communities and upcoming projects. Participants will discuss the bottom line consequences to Designing for Choice and review the costs for some of these ideas, discuss how communities can make gradual changes in order to meet budgets and still compete with new projects.
 
 
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Tuesday, March 22, 2011
8:15 — 9:15 a.m.

Track: Considerations for Effective Aging Environments
E21 — Sustainable Systems Design—Reducing Your Impact on the Environment While Improving Your Bottom Line
Tim Mueller, AIA, LEED AP, Vice President and Director of Seniors Design, SFCS;
Howard Alderson, AIA, LEED AP, President, Alderson Engineering, Inc.

As continuing care retirement communities face increased utility costs, establishment of sustainable systems can provide positive paybacks. This session will illuminate the current and forecasted energy issues the built environment is facing, with a a review of current oil, coal and natural gas reserves and the projected cost increases for energy. The session will then focus specifically on three sustainable systems: solar, geo exchange systems and wind energy generation with an in-depth discussion of the potential benefits, costs, paybacks and drawbacks to each system. Data on current installations, benchmarks of systems outside the U.S. and an overview of the potential impact on a new CCRC will be shared.

 
 
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8:15 — 9:15 a.m.

Track: Lessons Learned from Across the Globe
E22 — Reintroducing Community Integration in U.S. Nursing Homes—Case Studies from Europe
Christian Feldkircher, Dipl. Ing.; MSc in Health Design

Community integration (CI) is a strong tool for nursing home design and programming. Resting on five leading case studies from Austria and Switzerland, this session will highlight various aspects of CI within the physical and social enrivonment and demonstrate how CI can create a more stimulating environment to live and work in, making those buildings a hub for various social services. Participants will be able to define CI on various levels within the facility, understand the similarities and differences in how CI is used in the US and in Europe and discuss how thoughtful design and aesthetics lead to positive outcomes.

 
 
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8:15 — 9:15 a.m.
Track: Solutions that Enhances the Human Experience
E23 — Living with Dementia—How Design Can Make a Difference
Hilary Dalke, Professor of Design, Director Design Research Centre, Kingston University
 
Hear the results of a 12-month study of 19 care homes, conducted by the Design Research Centre at Kingston University. The study sought to identify factors that improve the quality of life for people with Alzheimer's disease and included specialists in environmental psychology, architecture, cognitive psychology, healthcare,and lighting in addition to staff, caretakers, managers and relatives. Key findings suggest the untapped potential of design to affect postive change. Participants will learn about the range of sensory design issues, explore the role that building design has on the sense of well-being in both the external and internal context and understand core elements of a resulting blueprint for a care home unit.
 
 
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8:15 — 9:15 a.m.

Track: Future-focused Models Leading Change
E24 — The Use of the Cohousing Model for an Innovative Elder-only Intentional Community
Anne Glass, Ph.D, Associate Professor and Assistant Director, University of Georgia Institute of Gerontology

ElderSpirit Community is one of the first elder cohousing communities in the United States and exemplifies one of the first truly new alternative living arrangements for older adults. In this model, residents proactively choose where and with whom they wish to live and manage the community themselves. ElderSpirit is also unique as it incorporates both owned units and federally subsidized low income rental units.This session highlights the results of a longitudinal mixed method study of resident perceptions with an indepth discussion of the cohousing model and process, the influence of design on the sense of community and mutual support and the emergence of new elder intentional communities.

 
 
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8:15 — 9:15 a.m.

Track: Understanding the Research and Regulatory Mindset
E25 — Creating Change in the Regulatory Milieu—National Culture Change Initiatives
Gaius Nelson, RA, NCARB, SMArchS, President, Nelson-Tremain Partners
Skip Gregory, RA, NCARB, SMArchS, Principal, Health Facility Consulting

Great strides have been made in the creation of physical environments that are conducive to the culture change model of long term care. Yet roadblocks to these efforts often come from regulators representing all levels of government. This presentation will introduce national efforts to use the established code revision procedures to mitigate these roadblocks. Session leaders will identify the major difficulties imposed by codes and standards and will inform participants of current code revision efforts. Participants will also explore areas of regulatory resistance to culture change, identify current regulatory reform efforts, understand how to influence and support regulatory reform and use design-based research to assist these efforts.

 
 
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8:15 — 9:15 a.m.

NEW!
Track: Aging in Place - Universal Design

A05 — Universal Design—Strategies to Communicate with Customers and Drive Sales
John P.S. Salmen, AIA, President, Universal Designers & Consultants, Inc., Publisher, Universal Design Newsletter
Tracy Lux, President, Trace Marketing
 
Research from the National Association of Home Builders and the MetLife Mature Market Institute revealed that many builders and remodelers understand the importance of universal design. However, many consumers still don't recognize the value of many UD features. Boomers may not want to admit they're getting older, but everyone in their lives — including their parents and grandkids — can benefit from these features. Education is vital • and it starts with you. In this session, find out how to speak the language of universal design to your customers, how to train your staff to market and sell these features and how to position your company as an industry leader. Participants will be able to describe the language involved in universal design, with an emphasis on words that resonate with customers of all ages, obtain a list of tools to for how to train your sales staff to communicate the value of universal design to prospects and understand how to showcase your company as a leader in universal design in the market(s) that you serve.
 
 
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11:15 a.m. — 12:15 p.m.
Track: Considerations for Effective Aging Environments
E26 — Integrating Culture Change—Non-Traditional Design Approaches
Andrew Alden, M.Arch., Senior Associate, Engberg Anderson, Inc.
Mark Proffitt, M.Arch., Ph.D. Candidate and Fellow, School of Architecture and Urban Planning, UW—Milwaukee and Institute on Aging and Environment

The physical environment should always be seen as a resource for culture change. Presenters will share a variety of approaches that can be used by the team to synthesize and gather information to inform design, and ensure that person-centered values remain at the forefront of decision making. Participants will explore non-traditional approaches to architectural design that engage a variety of stakeholders in a project, discuss innovative ways to percieve how the existing setting looks through the eyes of various stakeholders, and understand how to integrate research into the design process. You will leave armed with tools that will serve you well into the future!
 
 
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11:15 a.m. — 12:15 p.m.

Track: Lessons Learned from Across the Globe
E27 — Designing Long-Term Care Facilities—Lessons Learned from China
Zhipeng Lu, Ph.D., Postdoctoral researcher, Center for Health Systems & Design, Texas A&M University
David Green, Executive in Residence, Center for Community Partnerships, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

The Chinese population is aging at an unprecedented rate, with the number of people aged 60 years or older expected to climb to 248 million in 2020. Through three case studies, the challenges faced when trying to adapt the western care model in China will be addressed. Lessons learned from this session will not only help those seeking business opportunities in China but those who want to improve long-term care in western countries. The audience will gain insight into environments that respond to the needs and desires of persons from different cultures understand long-term care from a different perspective and identify business and research opportunities.

 
 
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11:15 a.m. — 12:15 p.m.
Track: Solutions that Enhances the Human Experience
E28 — I Am Old and I Cannot See—A Rehab Dilemma
Roberta Null, Ph.D., President, Common Place Design
Ruby Trow, Ph.D., Teacher Trainer in Adult Vocational Education, Cal Poly
Arlena Hines, ASID, IDEC, Professor, Environmental Design Building Technologies, Lansing Community College
 
Vision problems prevent many from enjoying their longevity. The Center for the Blind in San Diego, which has enjoyed national and international recogition, is unique in recognizing that most of its clients are elderly and need training in activities of daily living rather than job skills. Participants in this session will gain a unique view into this state-of-the-art facility and identify unique design and program features for the visually impaired, understand universal design features that create supportive learning environments and discuss criteria that should be considered in creating rehabilitation facilities for a low-vision elderly population.
 
 
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11:15 a.m. — 12:15 p.m.

Track: Future-focused Models Leading Change
E29 — Urban Planning Beyond the Hospital—A Collaboration With Our Community, Consumers and Business
James Easter, FAAMA, SVP, Principal, Director of Planning, HFR Design
Tom Phillips, FAAMA, President, Phillips and Associates Urban Planning

The balance of needs, expectations and resources within our communities is a sensitive one. As new federal legislation gains momentum and providers of care learn more about their mandates, community programs will be required to respond. This presentation will take a microscopic look at the past, benchmark successful programs of today and crystal ball what might become the windows of opportunity for future urban plans. Presenters will describe the primary, secondary and tertiary levels of care and how they can work to respond to the economic development needs of a region. Discuss how business, healthcare, education, recreation, wellness and fitness (from public and private programs) can come together to effectively address quality of life and a sustainable future.

 
 
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11:15 a.m. — 12:15 p.m.

Track: Understanding the Research and Regulatory Mindset
E30 — Predicting Staying Power—The Untapped Power of the POE
Jeffrey Anderzhon, Principal, Crepidoma Consulting
Kaye Brown, Adjunct Associate Professor, Boston University
Jack Bowersox, Manager, Life Wellness Communities Development Company, LLC

This interactive session explores the power of the POE and how it has been conducted in the past for projects that subsequently gained staying power and examines the features found in iconic senior projects. Participants will understand and value indicative post-occupancy evaluations as powerful tools for improving on future environments for aging and appreciate the limits of the POE as an evaluative tool for predicting projects with staying power in their markets. Learn how to create effective evaluation techniques for projects that can contribute to the growing body of evidence-based design and analytical processes and take away an understanding of the post-occupancy evaluation process and the value it provides to all designers and operators.

 
 
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11:15 a.m. — 12:15 p.m.

NEW!
Track: Aging in Place - Universal Design

A06 — Designing Homes that Make Life Easier—the Universal Design Living Laboratory
Rosemarie Rossetti, Ph.D., President, Rossetti Enterprises
 
This presentation is based on real life research and the Universal Design Living Laboratory, a new national demonstration home and garden in Columbus, Ohio. The presenter, Rosemarie Rossetti, Ph.D. will review what works, what sells, and where the challenges are. Participants will identify smart design solutions that provide independence for homebuyers with multiple needs and abilities, pinpoint design problems that negatively affect daily living and gain real life understanding of true universal design, accessible design, adaptable design, aging in place, and visitability. Essential components for kitchens, baths and entrances will be illustrated through real working examples as well as building techniques and products that are essential for any livable home.
 
 
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