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Sunday, March 20, 2011
4:15-5:30 p.m.

P01 - Culture Change and the Environment: What Are We Changing and Why?

 
Judah L. Ronch, Ph.D., Professor of Practice and Interim Dean, the Erickson School at The University of Maryland Baltimore County
 
We can view "culture change" as a movement that seeks to promote the highest level of autonomy, dignity and well-being in older persons. This session, presented by Dr. Ronch, will address how we can look at the environment in a comprehensive way so as to promote optimal development by harmonizing and aligning all aspects of the culture it supports and achieve optimized person-environment fit.

Dr. Ronch is currently Professor of Practice and Interim Dean of the Erickson School at The University of Maryland Baltimore County. Prior to coming to the Erickson School, he was Vice President of Resident Life, Mental Health and Wellness for Erickson Retirement Communities, was the founder and Executive Director of LifeSpan DevelopMental Systems.

 


 
The 2011 DESIGN/Environments for Aging Citation of Merit Awards Ceremony
5:30 — 6:00 pm
Don't miss a special awards ceremony where Long-Term Living magazine, SAGE, The Center for Health Design, and The American Society of Interior Designers recognize the 2011 DESIGN/Environments for Aging Citation of Merit award winners. At this ceremony, one Citation of Merit award winner will be announced as "Best in Show," the award to the project that best exemplifies exceptional use of master planning and designs that promote seniors' highest levels of physical and cognitive functioning and emotional well-being—in ways that support their dignity, self-esteem, and quality of life.
 
 

Tuesday, March 22, 2010
12:30-2:00 p.m.

 
P02 - The Elder-Centric Village™ (ECV) Movement—A Model for Senior Living and Urban Renewal

Dodd Kattman

, AIA, LEED AP, Partner, Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
Zachary Benedict, Assoc. AIA, LEED AP, Senior Associate, Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.

Throughout Baby Boomers' lifetime the word "community" has steadily transformed. As these individuals begin to select environments in which to retire, their expectations will revolutionize the way CCRC's are defined and developed. This keynote will explore how market demand driven by aging Boomers will introduce a drastically different set of considerations for senior care providers; focusing their attention on social interaction and civic inclusion. Through an extensive collection of sociological research, economic development analysis, and integrated planning case studies, Kattman and Benedict present the feasibility of utilizing senior living as a key component in the creation and promotion of ECV's in an effort to foster the return of intergenerational communities.