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How to grow your rehab business

March 30, 2011
by Patricia Sheehan, Editor-in-Chief
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Healthcare reform and other changes in the marketplace are having a significant effect on rehabilitation service providers. In addition to factors like aging demographics and increased competition for short-term rehab patients, regulatory changes and increased scrutiny demand preparation for forces that impact one’s business.

Mary van de Kamp and Judy Benjamin of Peoplefirst Rehabilitation addressed these issues in a webinar presented by Long-Term Living. Among their recommendations for building a strong rehab program:

Build your rehab program around quality people. Hire and retain therapy professionals with appropriate qualifications; identify and leverage the specialized skill sets of each therapist; and invest in ongoing education, leadership development, and mentoring initiatives.

Specialization and customization are key. Develop programs which meet the needs of the resident population and community; provide a variety of clinical programs that support clinical outcomes and business growth; and develop and market programs not readily available in your market.

 

Know the rules and follow them. Routine changes in state and federal regulations require constant attendance and oversight. Documentation competency, audits, and multi-level oversight provide support for business growth.

 

Measure and document outcomes. Demonstrate results of programs and intervention strategies, identify opportunities for performance improvement, and differentiate from the competition.

 

Position your facility for health reform and alignment with hospital partners.

 

Understand your market. Know your strengths, be knowledgeable about the competition, and track referral sources. Cultivate and maintain excellent relations with referral sources. Promote opportunities for the community to interact with your facility (e.g. CEU offerings, open houses).

 

To access a PDF of the Peoplefirst slide presentation or the archive of the event, click here.

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Patricia Sheehan

Patricia Sheehan

@longtermliving

Patricia Sheehan wrote for Long-Term Living when she was editor-in-chief. She left that...