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Your thoughts on advertising Five-Star ratings

July 23, 2009
by Kevin Kolus
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Does your facility mention its Five-Star rating to attract visiting customers?

Comments:

- We need to do more education on everything about the Five-Star program—not only the general public but the homes also.

- I think one of the most important factors is what a person experiences when they enter a facility. Do they actually go into these facilities? I don’t think so. The rating is not accurate.

- Our facility was recently downgraded to four stars. The explanation given was very confusing. We have a small facility of 36 beds and the statistics reviewed all the number 199 after it which means the facility figures are too small to be significant. Also, the quality measurements weigh heavily on mobility. There are 36 beds here and 22 residents over age 85. They are declining in function despite interventions. One resident is quadriplegic and refuses to get out of bed. One other resident mentioned in the review was on hospice and dying. I just don’t think the rating system is accurate.

- Although I don’t believe the public is well educated on the Five-Star system, there is enough knowledge to make a difference for a facility if you are five stars or not. We are a five-star facility, and we have the CMS rating posted at every entrance of our building. We do not make issue with it to the extreme, but it is there for any and all to see.

How does your facility handle its rating? Post your findings in the comments below.

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Comments

We too are a facility that was downgraded from a 5 star to a 4 star, with an increase from 3 stars to 4 stars for QM. I think it is unfair to down grade when no health inspection was done and QM were improved. But because only 10% can be 5 Stars, we had to remove our signs about our 5 star rating, but nothing has changed and in fact things had actually improved.

Kevin Kolus

Kevin Kolus

@longtermliving

www.ltlmagazine.com/blog/kevin-kolus

Kevin Kolus wrote for Long-Term Living when he was an editor. He left the brand in 2012...