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Highlights from EFA.09 Sessions

April 2, 2009
by D80299AB235D4106A01E691D4370777B
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Although the weather in Boston started off a little foggy, the Environments for Aging speakers came with a clear goal: our most frail and elderly need a better built environment of care and here’s how we’re gonna do it.


The EFA sessions provided a wealth of article ideas for LTL. Here’s a quick tour of some of the topics gathered by the editors. We’d like to know which interests you most; so please take the poll below.


Learning never stops
Lasell Village, a retirement home with an onsite skilled nursing and rehabilitation facility in Auburndale, MA, is one of a growing number of college-affiliated retirement communities. But it is the first to feature a formal, individualized, and required continuing education program for residents. The residents are able to walk to the connected campus of Lasell College and meet, learn, and play with younger generations. Residents complete a minimum of 450 hours of learning and fitness activity each calendar year.

Intergenerational care
Tom Payton, principal, Architectural Dimensions LLC, and Michelle Dionisio, president/CEO, Interfaith Community Care, presented Interfaith’s more recent project that includes both adult and child daycare services. The design of the building and its services, the land parcel’s ideal placement near a park and university campus, and a synergistic relationship with other social services has turned a simple daycare concept into a community attraction for all ages. The building houses adult daycare services, child daycare services, and a bisto that serves clients and the public. Ultimately, the site will create a hub of services where all ages can intermingle.




The Green House model


The Green House is a model of care that is simultaneously involved in changing the philosophy of care, the architecture of the built care environment, and the organizational structure of the care. Read “

Care model thinks small, generates big buzz at EFA” for more info.


Figure 1: Hyde said that if you are unsure if a hallway length is too long for your residents, throw some corns in your shoes and walk the distance five times—then you’ll know.

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