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Hoffman Corporation, Good Shepherd Services - Meadow Wood

January 1, 2002
by root
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Seymour, Wisconsin - Appleton, Wisconsin
Good Shepherd Services - Meadow Wood - Seymour, Wisconsin
Hoffman Corporation - Appleton, Wisconsin Type of Facility/Setting: Assisted Living

Facility Contact: Mary Ann Kehoe

Firm: Hoffman Corporation, (920) 380-2134

Design Team: Terry McLaughlin, Project Architect; Mike Theiss, Job Captain; Bob Vandermeer, Construction Manager; Dan Werbeckes, Job Superintendent (Hoffman Corporation); Kay Tellock, Interior Design (Cline and Hanson)

Photography: Mark Schaible, Weston Imaging Group

Resident Capacity: 18 units

Space/Resident (sq. ft.): 896

Total Area (sq. ft.): 17,801

Total Cost (excluding land): $1.7 million

Cost/Sq. Ft.: $95

Completion: June 2001 Good Shepherd Services has answered the growing need for assisted living with Meadow Wood'Phase II, complementing other campus services-skilled nursing, child care, clinical, senior center, and community and rehab agencies. Phase II was created with the involvement of residents, staff, a state regulatory official and an integrated design and construction management team. Focus group feedback from residents of Phase I was key in design considerations.

Primary goals were: to enhance residents' mobility, comfort, safety and socialization; to celebrate residents' agricultural heritage; to design a caregiver-friendly work environment that enhances resident care and employee job satisfaction; and to maintain even light quality throughout the residence.

Phase II's 18 one-bedroom apartments are situated in six households within three neighborhoods. The neighborhoods all meet at a spacious, comfortable community center. The focal point is a huge saltwater fish aquarium, beautifully lighted and visible from each neighborhood.

The staff area was designed to increase caregiver efficiency by reducing travel to apartments and time required to fulfill responsibilities. Staff work areas are directly adjacent to laundry and utility rooms.

"Great rooms" in each neighborhood are created from 12-foot-wide corridors, with wing walls providing shelving and visually reducing the length of the corridors. Crowned by 20-foot cathedral ceilings with skylights, daylight-glow is maintained in the evening through recessed tray lighting.

Individual apartments include living room, kitchen, bedroom and private bathroom. Each toilet area is designed to accommodate a double transfer, a space challenge addressed with fold-down grab bar systems. Wall outlets were raised and light switches lowered. Each apartment has either a spacious bay window or sliding glass doors with outside access.
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