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DESIGN CENTER March-2001

March 1, 2001
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Meadowview at The Wartburg Mount Vernon, New York March-2001
Meadowview at The Wartburg Mount Vernon, New York Type of Facility/Setting:
Assisted Living Administrator:
Architecture Firm:


Resident Capacity:
Total Area:
Construction Cost:
Cost/Square Foot:
Assisted Living
Susan Carpenter
Perkins Eastman Architects PC
New York, New York
(212) 353-7200
105 units
74,000 sq. ft.
$13,200,000
$178 ADMINISTRATOR COMMENTS
Susan Carpenter, Administrator, Meadowview: "Meadowview is a community within a community within a community. It is part of the 26-acre campus of The Wartburg Adult Care Community which, although situated in the heart of Westchester, New York, has a secluded, park-like atmosphere. Aptly named, Meadowview's garden overlooks a meadow, as well as the rest of the campus.

"This state-of-the-art, 105-unit assisted living facility has 65 studio, 38 one-bedroom and 2 two-bedroom apartments. It was designed for flexibility. For example, we had a prospective resident who wanted a deluxe one-bedroom apartment. We combined two studio apartments, converting the second apartment's kitchen into a walk-in closet (by concealing the room's plumbing and wiring with drywall) and giving her a large living room and bedroom. If we ever want to convert it back, we can quite easily do so.

"Although The Wartburg already had an assisted living program, we needed more AL space. This building fits nicely into the continuum of care, which also includes skilled nursing and independent living. Our independent living townhouses are single-occupancy cottages, designed for extremely independent residents who, if they require support services, can contract with home healthcare for them. Meadowview is more in the hotel style. We encourage residents to be as independent as they can, but we provide three meals a day and personal care and other services. Meals are served restaurant style, with the dining room open from 8:30 to 10 a.m. for breakfast, 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. for lunch and 4:30 to 6 p.m. for dinner.

"Our Wellness Staff are available 24 hours a day to help with bathing, medications, etc. Other services include transportation for weekly shopping trips (although residents may have their own cars if they wish), church attendance and field trips; a small in-house gift shop; a beauty parlor; and a wellness center with a personal trainer.

"Meadowview features a wide variety of common spaces, such as a cafT, billiard room, a room for playing cards, a library, a media center and a computer room for residents. "Each unit has a kitchenette with a microwave, sink and midsize refrigerator/freezer (large enough to hold 2 half-gallons of ice cream, instead of the small dorm-room size). There is also a large country kitchen for the use of residents who wish to do more extensive cooking and baking.

"Every unit has a private bath with a shower stall large enough to accommodate an ample shower seat, with grab bars and an adjustable/removable shower head. All the units also have a personal emergency response system to alert staff 24 hours a day if someone needs assistance. The system also includes a motion detector, which notifies staff of lack of activity in the units so they can check on residents.

"One thing we learned on this project was that although small spaces are intimate, it's a good idea to plan one large space that will accommodate all the residents at once. We compensate for this, though, basically by using the adjoining spaces on the entire first floor-including the main dining room, the private dining room and the lounge-for large gatherings.

"Our program staff worked hand in hand with the architect to ensure that Meadowview would be suitable for aging in place. We also sought input from residents and adapted plans accordingly. For example, residents asked for a stereo system in the dining room so they could listen to classical music. It wasn't in the original plans, so we changed them. Our program department visited the construction site often and made suggestions, such as the correct height for closet poles and mailboxes. The design is sensitive both to the residents and to the programs serving them."
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